Images of New Hampshire History

<p>On this day in 1776 New Hampshire declared its Independence from Great Britain. <br/>
<a href="http://www.images-of-new-hampshire-history.com/On-This-Day-in-New-Hampshire-History.php">http://www.images-of-new-hampshire-history.com/On-This-Day-in-New-Hampshire-History.php</a></p>

On this day in 1776 New Hampshire declared its Independence from Great Britain.
http://www.images-of-new-hampshire-history.com/On-This-Day-in-New-Hampshire-History.php

Posted 22 weeks ago
<p>Born on this day in 1730 in Kittery Maine, William Whipple. He moved  to Portsmouth NH  at the  age of 29 and married his Cousin Catherine Moffat. Elected representative to the Continental Congress and signed the Declaration of independence. </p>

<p><a href="http://www.images-of-new-hampshire-history.com/On-This-Day-in-New-Hampshire-History.php">http://www.images-of-new-hampshire-history.com/On-This-Day-in-New-Hampshire-History.php</a></p>

Born on this day in 1730 in Kittery Maine, William Whipple. He moved to Portsmouth NH at the age of 29 and married his Cousin Catherine Moffat. Elected representative to the Continental Congress and signed the Declaration of independence.

http://www.images-of-new-hampshire-history.com/On-This-Day-in-New-Hampshire-History.php

Posted 22 weeks ago
<p><b>Born on this day in 1920 - James Colgate Cleveland, Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1963 - 1980</b></p>

Born on this day in 1920 - James Colgate Cleveland, Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1963 - 1980

Posted 22 weeks ago
Posted 22 weeks ago

January 1

1809: Born - Ira Allen Eastman : Represented New Hampshire from 1839 - 1842,

 Born in Gilmanton, N.H., January 1, 1809; attended the local schools; was graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1829; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1832 and commenced practice in Troy, N.H.; returned to Gilmanton in 1834 and continued the practice of law; clerk of the State house of representatives in 1835; member of the State house of representatives 1836-1838, and served as speaker in 1837 and 1838; register of probate from 1836 to 1839; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1839-March 3, 1843); chairman, Committee on Revisal and Unfinished Business (Twenty-seventh Congress); was not a candidate for renomination in 1842; judge of the court of common pleas 1844-1849; associate judge of the supreme court 1849-1855; judge of the superior judicial court from 1855 to 1859; chosen trustee of Dartmouth College in 1859; unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Governor in 1863 and for United States Senator in 1866; resumed the practice of law; died in Manchester, N.H., March 21, 1881; interment in Valley Cemetery.

Ira Allen Eastman

January 4

1789 : Born  - John Hardy Steele - the twenty-seventh governor of New Hampshire, was born in Salisbury, North Carolina on January 4, 1789. As a young child, he lost both of his parents, and consequently, his education was affected. He left school early to work as an apprentice in the machinist trade. He eventually built the Union Manufacturing Company cotton mill, as well as designing the first power loom in New Hampshire. Steele first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he was elected to in 1829. He also served as Governor Harvey's aide in 1830; was town moderator from 1830 to 1838; and served on the Governor's Executive Council from 1840 to 1842. Steele next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor in the 1844 general election. He was reelected to a second term in 1845. During his tenure, a state railroad commission was created; and the state's ore industry was initiated. After completing his term, Steele continued to stay active in politics, serving as town selectman in 1846. Governor John H. Steele passed away on July 3, 1865, and was buried in the Village Cemetery in Peterborough, New Hampshire.

John H Steele Nh State House Portrait

1791: Born General Joseph P. Cilley -  (nephew of Bradbury Cilley and brother of Jonathan Cilley), a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Nottingham, Rockingham County, N.H., January 4, 1791; attended the common schools and graduated from Atkinson Academy, New Hampshire; engaged in agricultural pursuits; served in the New Hampshire Regiment, United States Infantry 1812-1816, attained the brevetted rank of captain; quartermaster of New Hampshire in 1817; division inspector in 1821; aide-de-camp to the Governor in 1827; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Levi Woodbury and served from June 13, 1846, until March 3, 1847; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1846; retired to his farm in Nottingham, N.H., and died there September 16, 1887; interment in the General Joseph Cilley Burying Ground in Nottingham Square. 

January 5

1793: Born - Jared Perkins - A Representative from New Hampshire; born in Unity, Sullivan County, N.H., January 5, 1793; attended the common schools of Unity and Claremont; studied theology; was ordained as a minister in 1824 and served for thirty years; State councilor 1846-1848; served in the State house of representatives in 1850; elected as a Whig to the Thirty-second Congress (March 4, 1851-March 3, 1853); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1852 to the Thirty-third Congress; nominated for Governor of New Hampshire in 1854 but died before the election; appointed justice of the peace in 1854 and served until his death in Nashua, N.H., October 15, 1854; interment in West Unity Cemetery, Unity, N.H.


1845: Born - Carlton Camp born  in Hanover , New Hampshire - Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He served in the Union Army as a Private in Company B, 18th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for action at Petersburg, Virginia on April 2, 1865. His citation reads "Brought off from the picket line, under heavy fire, a comrade who had been shot through both legs. Carlton died on 1 September 1926 and his remains are interred at the Etna Cemetery in Hanover, New Hampshire.

January 6

1892: Rochester Chartered as a New Hampshire City.

January 8


1899: Born - Sherman Adams - Representative from New Hampshire in Congress from 1945 - 1946 , Governor from 1949 - 1953

Sherman was born in East Dover, Windham County, Vt., January 8, 1899; as an infant moved with his parents to Providence, R.I.; attended the public schools of Providence; served in the United States Marine Corps during the First World War; was graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1920; engaged in the lumber business in Healdville, Vt., in 1921 and 1922 and in the paper and lumber business in Lincoln, N.H., 1923-1944; also engaged in banking; member of the New Hampshire house of representatives 1941-1944, serving as speaker in 1943 and 1944; chairman of the Grafton County Republican Committee 1942-1944; delegate to the Republican National Conventions in 1944 and 1952; elected as a Republican to the Seventy-ninth Congress (January 3, 1945-January 3, 1947); was not a candidate for re-nomination in 1946 but was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for the gubernatorial nomination; engaged as a representative of the American Pulpwood Industry in New York City 1946-1948; Governor of New Hampshire January 1, 1949-January 1, 1953; appointed The Assistant to President Eisenhower January 21, 1953, and served until his resignation September 22, 1958; engaged in writing and lecturing; established a ski resort in 1966 and was president and chairman of the board of Loon Mountain Corporation; was a resident of Lincoln, N.H., until his death in Hanover, N.H., October 27, 1986; interment in Riverside Cemetery, Lincoln, N.H. 

Sherman Adams, New Hampshire State House Portrait

January 9


1782: Born - Benning Moulton Bean, a Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1833 - 1836.

 Benning was born in Moultonboro, Carroll County, N.H., on January 9, 1782; attended the public schools of Moultonboro and received private tutoring; engaged in teaching and in agricultural pursuits; selectman of Moultonboro 1811-1829 and 1832-1838; justice of the peace in 1816; trustee of Sandwich Academy in 1824; member of the State house of representatives 1815-1823; served in the State senate 1824-1826; again a member of the State house of representatives in 1827; member of the Governor’s council in 1829; again served in the State senate in 1831 and 1832, being president the latter year; elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1833-March 3, 1837); declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1836; resumed teaching and agricultural pursuits in Moultonboro, Carroll County, N.H., where he died February 6, 1866; interment in Bean Cemetery.

Benning Bean, NH State House Portrait

1861 - Concord Annual Ball

January 10

1832: Born - George M Lovering (Springfield): Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor

Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He served as a First Lieutenant in the Union Army. He was awarded the Medal of Honor as a First Sergeant in Company I, 4th Massachusetts Infantry for action on June 14, 1863 at Port Hudson, Louisiana. His citation reads "During a momentary confusion in the ranks caused by other troops rushing upon the regiment, this soldier, with coolness and determination, rendered efficient aid in preventing a panic among the troops." 

1892: Born - William Nathaniel Rogers, a Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1923 - 1924 and 1931 - 1936

Rogers wasborn in Sanbornville, Carroll County, N.H., January 10, 1892; attended the public schools, Brewster Free Academy, Wolfeboro, N.H., and Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H.; was graduated from the law department of the University of Maine at Orono in 1916; was admitted to the bar the same year and practiced in Sanbornville and Rochester, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives in 1917, 1919, and 1921; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-eighth Congress (March 4, 1923-March 3, 1925); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1924 to the Sixty-ninth Congress; resumed the practice of his profession in Concord, N.H.; moderator of the town of Wakefield, N.H., 1928-1945; elected January 5, 1932, to fill the vacancy in the Seventy-second Congress caused by the death of Fletcher Hale; reelected to the Seventy-third and Seventy-fourth Congresses and served from January 5, 1932, to January 3, 1937; was not a candidate for renomination, but was an unsuccessful candidate for election to the United States Senate in 1936; resumed the practice of law in Concord, N.H., until 1943, when he moved to Sanbornville, N.H., and continued practice until his death in Wolfeboro, N.H., September 25, 1945; interment in Lovell Lake Cemetery, Sanbornville, N.H.

William Nathaniel Rogers

Born - 1838: Francis H Goodall (Bath, New Hampshire) - Medal of Honor RecipientAwarded for actions during the Civil War

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to First Sergeant Francis Henry Goodall, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 13 December 1862, while serving with Company G, 11th New Hampshire Infantry, in action at Fredericksburg, Virginia. With the assistance of another soldier First Sergeant Goodall brought a wounded comrade into the lines, under heavy fire.

General Orders: Date of Issue: December 14, 1894

Action Date: December 13, 1862

January 11

1787 - Incorporated - The New Hampshire Town of Langdon

 1794-Incorporated: The New Hampshire Town of Milford

Born: 1841 -  Henry Moore Baker,  Represented  New Hampshire in Congress from 1893 - 1896;


Henry Baker wasborn in Bow, near Concord, N.H., January 11, 1841; attended the common schools, Pembroke, Tilton, and Hopkinton Academies, New Hampshire; was graduated from the New Hampshire Conference Seminary in 1859, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1863, and the law school of Columbian (now George Washington) University, Washington, D.C., in 1866; was admitted to the bar in 1866; clerk in the War and Treasury Departments 1864-1874; commenced the practice of law in Washington, D.C., in 1874; judge advocate general of the National Guard of New Hampshire in 1886 and 1887 with rank of brigadier general; member of the State senate in 1891 and 1892; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-third and Fifty-fourth Congresses (March 3, 1893-March 3, 1897); was not a candidate for renomination in 1896; resumed the practice of his profession in Washington, D.C., but retained his legal residence in Bow, N.H.; member of the New Hampshire house of representatives 1905-1909; died in Washington, D.C., May 30, 1912; interment in Alexander Cemetery, Bow, N.H.

Henry Moore Baker

January 13

1682 - Lords of Trade and Plantations Report

1779 -Born: William Badger -  the twenty-third governor of New Hampshire, was born in Gilmanton, New Hampshire on January 13, 1779. His education was attained in an academy in Gilmanton. Before embarking into politics, Badger established a successful business career. He was instrumental in building several mills, as well as a factory in his hometown. Badger first entered politics as trustee of Gilmanton Academy, a position he was elected to in 1804, and from which he later served as chairman of the board. From 1805 to 1812 he was an aide to Governor John Langdon; and from 1810 to 1812 he served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives. Badger served as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1814 to 1817; was senate president from 1816 to 1817; and served on the common pleas court bench from 1816 to 1820. He also served as the Strafford County high sheriff from 1820 to 1830; and was a presidential elector in 1824, 1836 and 1844. Badger next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1834. He was reelected to a second term in 1835. During his tenure, legislation was sanctioned that facilitated smallpox prevention; improvements to the state militia were lobbied for; and penal reforms were endorsed. After completing his term, Badger retired from political life. Governor William Badger passed away in Gilmanton on September 21, 1852.

1906 - Durham Libraries Consolidated

 

January 14

1730 - Born: William Whipple -  a Delegate from New Hampshire; born in Kittery, York County, Maine, January 14, 1730; became a sailor and engaged in the slave trade; freed his slaves and engaged in mercantile pursuits in Portsmouth, N.H.; delegate to the Provincial Congress at Exeter in 1775; Member of the Continental Congress 1776-1779; declined to be a candidate for renomination; one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence; commissioned a brigadier general in 1777; member of the State assembly 1780-1784; participated in several battles in the Revolutionary War; appointed judge of the State supreme court in 1782; financial receiver for New Hampshire 1782-1784; died in Portsmouth, N.H., November 28, 1785; interment in the Old North Burial Ground. 

1826 - Born: Lt. Colonel Oliver Woodbury Lull. 

Oliver was born in Weare, the son of Moses Lull. He was an officer in the army,

t Colonel Oliver Woodbury LullLkilled in battle at Port Hudson, aged 37 years & 5 months.

U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles:
Name: Oliver Woodbury Lull                                            Residence: Milford, NH
Occupation: Lawyer
Enlistment Date: 10 Jan 1861                                           Rank at enlistment: Lieut Colonel
State Served: New Hampshire
Service Record: Commissioned an officer in Company S, New Hampshire 8th Infantry Regiment on 25 Dec 1861. Mustered out on 27 May 1863 at Port Hudson, LA

Lt Colonel Oliver Woodbury Lull, Weare NH

January 15

1796 - The New Hampshire Town of Alton was Incorporated

January 18

1782 - Born: Daniel Webster - Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1813 - 1816;

Daniel wasborn in Salisbury, N.H., January 18, 1782; attended district schools and Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H.; graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1801; principal of an academy at Fryeburg, Maine, in 1802; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1805 and commenced practice in Boscawen, near Salisbury, N.H.; moved to Portsmouth, N.H., in 1807 and continued the practice of law; elected as a Federalist from New Hampshire to the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Congresses (March 4, 1813-March 3, 1817); was not a candidate for reelection in 1816 to the Fifteenth Congress; moved to Boston, Mass., in 1816; achieved national fame as counsel representing Dartmouth College before the United States Supreme Court in the Dartmouth College case 1816-1819; delegate to the Massachusetts State constitutional convention in 1820; elected from Massachusetts to the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Congresses and served from March 4, 1823, to May 30, 1827; did not serve in the Twentieth Congress; chairman, Committee on the Judiciary (Eighteenth and Nineteenth Congresses); elected as Adams (later Anti-Jacksonian) on June 8, 1827, to the United States Senate for the term beginning March 4, 1827, credentials presented on December 3, 1827, and took oath of office on December 17, 1827; reelected as a Whig in 1833 and 1839 and served until his resignation, effective February 22, 1841; chairman, Committee on Finance (Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Congresses); unsuccessful Whig candidate for president in 1836; appointed Secretary of State by President William Henry Harrison and again by President John Tyler and served from 1841 to 1843; again elected as a Whig to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1845, to July 22, 1850, when he resigned; appointed Secretary of State by President Millard Fillmore and served from July 22, 1850, until his death in Marshfield, Massachusetts., October 24, 1852; interment in the Winslow Cemetery. 

Daniel Webster, NH State Library Portrait

January 19

January 19, 1810 - Cold Friday


1838: Born - Osgood T. Hadley - Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

Osgood was born in Nashua on January 19, 1838. He served as a Sergeant in the Union Army in Company E, 6th New Hampshire Veteran Infantry. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for action on September 30, 1864 near Pegram House, Virginia. His citation reads "As color bearer of his regiment he defended his colors with great personal gallantry and brought them safely out of the action."

Osgood T. Hadley, Congressional Medal Of Honor Recipient

January 23

1809: Born - Edmund Burke - , Represented  New Hampshire in Congress from 1839 - 1844.

Edmund Burke was born in Westminster, Vt., January 23, 1809; attended the public schools; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1826 and commenced practice in Colebrook, N.H.; moved to Claremont, N.H., in 1833 and assumed editorial management of the New Hampshire Argus; moved to Newport in 1834 and united the Argus with the Spectator of that place, continuing as editor for several years; commissioned as adjutant in the State militia in 1837 and as brigade inspector in 1838; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-sixth, Twenty-seventh, and Twenty-eighth Congresses (March 4, 1839-March 3, 1845); was not a candidate for re-nomination in 1844; appointed Commissioner of Patents by President Polk and served from May 5, 1846, to September 3, 1850; resumed the practice of law in Newport, N.H.; delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in 1844 and 1852; delegate to the Democratic State convention in 1867, and served as presiding officer; member of the State board of agriculture in 1871; died in Newport, Sullivan County, N.H., January 25, 1882; interment in Maple Grove Cemetery. 

General Assembly Meeting - Concord - January 26, 1778

January 27

1845: Born - George E. Albee (Lisbon NH) Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor

George Albee was born in Lisbon, New Hampshire. He enlisted in Company G (Wisconsin), Berdan's Sharpshooters in June 1862. After two months in the field he was wounded at the Second Battle of Bull Run and discharged for disability while convalescing. In1863 he enlisted again as an artilleryman in the 3rd Wisconsin Light Artillery but was discharged to accept a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 36th Wisconsin Infantry; he was later promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

After the Civil War Albee served as a lieutenant in the 36th U.S. Colored Infantry (1866), 41st U.S. Infantry (1866–1869), 24th U.S. Infantry (1869-1878). Albee was awarded the Medal of Honor in January 1894 for his actions in Brazos River, Texas on October 28, 1869 while serving with the 41st United States Infantry Regiment.

He retired from the US Army in 1878, and later became Captain of the "National Blues" Company D 2nd Regiment Connecticut National Guard in 1891. Shortly thereafter, Albee was promoted to Major and Brigade Inspector of Rifle Practice of the Connecticut National Guard

January 28

1986: Challenger Tragedy. Christa McAuliffe - Teacher in Space lost her life in the Challenger Space Shuttle explosion.

PERSONAL DATA: Born September 2, 1948 in Boston, Massachusetts. She is survived by husband Steven and two children. Her listed recreational interests included jogging, tennis, and volleyball.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Marian High School, Framingham, Massachusetts, in 1966; received a bachelor of arts degree, Framingham State College, 1970; and a masters degree in education, Bowie State College, Bowie, Maryland, 1978.

ORGANIZATIONS: Board member, New Hampshire Council of Social Studies; National Council of Social Studies; Concord Teachers Association; New Hampshire Education Association; and the National Education Association.

AWARDS: Posthumously awarded the Congressional Space Medal of Honor.

OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES: Member, Junior Service League; teacher, Christian Doctrine Classes, St. Peters Church; host family, A Better Chance Program (ABC), for inner-city students; and fundraiser for Concord Hospital and Concord YMCA.

EXPERIENCE:

  • 1970-1971 Benjamin Foulois Junior High School, Morningside, Maryland. Teacher. American history, 8th grade.
  • 1971-1978 Thomas Johnson Junior High School, Lanham, Maryland. Teacher. English and American history, 8th grade and civics, 9th grade.
  • 1978-1979 Rundlett Junior High School, Concord, New Hampshire. Teacher, 7th grade and American history, 8th grade.
  • 1980-1982 Bow Memorial (Middle) School, Bow, New Hampshire. Teacher. Social Studies, 9th grade.
  • 1982-1985 Concord High School, Concord, New Hampshire. Teacher. Courses in economics, law, American history, and a course she developed entitled The American Woman, 10th, 11th, and 12th grade.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Christa McAuliffe was selected as the primary candidate for the NASA Teacher in Space Project on July 19, 1985. She was a payload specialist on STS 51-L which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 11:38:00 EST on January 28, 1986. The crew on board the Orbiter Challenger included the spacecraft commander, Mr. F.R. Scobee, the pilot, Commander M.J. Smith (USN), three mission specialists, Dr. R.E. McNair, Lieutenant Colonel E.S. Onizuka (USAF), and Dr. J.A. Resnik, and fellow civilian payload specialist, Mr. G.B. Jarvis. The STS 51-L crew died on January 28, 1986 when Challenger exploded after launch.

January 30

1769 - Born - Charles Cutts in Portsmouth.

 Charles Cutts, a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Portsmouth, N.H., January 31, 1769; graduated from Harvard University in 1789; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1795 and practiced; member, State house of representatives 1803-1810, serving as speaker in 1807, 1808, and 1810; elected as a Federalist to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Nahum Parker and served from June 21, 1810, to March 3, 1813; subsequently appointed to fill the vacancy occurring at the close of his term and served from April 2, 1813, to June 15, 1813; elected secretary of the United States Senate and served from October 12, 1814, to December 12, 1825; moved to Fairfax County, Va., and settled near Lewinsville, Va., where he died January 25, 1846; interment in a private cemetery near Lewinsville, Fairfax County, Va. 

January 31

1764 - The New Hampshire Town of Lincoln was Granted

February 1

1760: Born -  Bradbury Cilley - US Congressman. Born in Nottingham NH on February 1, 1760.A member of a family prominent in New Hampshire politics and government, he was educated locally and became a farmer. In 1798 he was appointed US Marshal for New Hampshire, an office he held until 1802. In 1812 he was elected to the US House of Representatives as a Federalist and served two terms, 1813 to 1817. An active militia officer, Cilley served as a Colonel and military aide to Governor John T. Gilman from 1814-1816. After leaving Congress Cilley retired from public life and resumed farming in Nottingham. He was the uncle of Congressman Jonathan Cilley of Maine and US Senator Joseph Cilley of New Hampshire

February 2

1911: Born - Richard O'Kane (Dover) ; Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor

The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure
in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to
COMMANDER RICHARD H. O'KANE
UNITED STATES NAVY
for service as set forth in the following
CITATION:

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the USS TANG operating against two enemy Japanese convoys on October 23 and 24, 1944, during her Fifth and last War Patrol. Boldly maneuvering on the surface into the midst of a heavily escorted convoy, Commander O'Kane stood in a fusillade of bullets and shells from all directions to launch smashing hits on three tankers, coolly swung his ship to fire at a freighter and, in a split second decision, shot out of the path of an onrushing transport, missing it by inches. Boxed in by blazing tankers, a freighter, transport and several destroyers, he blasted two of the targets with his remaining torpedoes and, with pyrotechnics bursting on all sides, cleared the area. Twenty-four hours later, he again made contact with a heavily escorted convoy steaming to support the Leyte campaign with reinforcements and supplies and with crated planes piled high on each unit. In defiance of the enemy' relentless fire, he closed the concentration of ships and in quick succession sent two torpedoes each into the first and second transports and an adjacent tanker, finding his mark with each torpedo in a series of violent explosions at less than a thousand-yard range. With ships bearing down from all sides, he charged the enemy at high speed, exploding the tanker in a burst of flame, smashing the transport dead in the water and blasting the destroyer with a mighty roar which rocked the TANG from stem to stern. Expending his last two torpedoes into the remnants of a once powerful convoy before his own ship went down, Commander O'Kane aided by his gallant command, achieved an illustrious record of heroism in combat, enhancing the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service."


RADM Richard Hetherington O'Kane, USN
(1911-1994)

Richard Hetherington O'Kane was born in Dover, NH on 2 February 1911. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1934, served aboard the cruiser Chester and destroyer Pruitt, received submarine instruction in 1938, and served on USS Argonaut until 1942. Lieutenant O'Kane then joined the pre-commissioning crew of the submarine Wahoo, serving as her Executive Officer under Commanding Officer Dudley W. Morton, and establishing a record as a very promising tactician.

In July 1943, Lieutenant Commander O'Kane became Prospective Commanding Officer of USS Tang, which he commanded throughout her entire career. In five war patrols, Tang sank an officially recognized total of 24 Japanese ships, establishing one of the Pacific War's top records for submarine achievement. He was captured by the Japanese when his ship was sunk off China in October 1944, and was secretly held prisoner until the war's end ten months later. Following his release, Commander O'Kane was awarded the Medal of Honor for his "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity" during his submarine's final operations against Japanese shipping.

Following WW II, Commander O'Kane served in the Pacific Reserve Fleet as Commanding Officer of the submarine tender Pelias, testified at Japanese war crimes trials, was Executive Officer of the submarine tender Nereus and Commander of Submarine Division 32. He attended the Armed Forces Staff College in 1950-51, and was assigned to Submarine School at New London, CT, initially as an instructor and, in 1952-53, as Officer in Charge.

Promoted to Captain in July 1953, he commanded the submarine tender Sperry until June 1954 and became Commander Submarine Squadron Seven. After attending Naval War College in 1955-56, he served in Washington, DC, with the Ship Characteristics Board. Captain O'Kane retired in July 1957 and, on the basis of his extensive combat awards, was simultaneously advanced to Rear Admiral on the Retired List. He died on 16 February 1994. The guided-missile destroyer USS O'Kane (DDG-77) is named in honor of Rear Admiral O'Kane.

February 3

1821: Born - Aaron Harrison Cragin, a Representative and a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Weston, Windsor County, Vt., February 3, 1821; completed preparatory studies; studied law; admitted to the bar in Albany, N.Y., in 1847 and commenced practice in Lebanon, N.H.; member, New Hampshire house of representatives 1852-1855; elected by the American Party to the Thirty-fourth Congress and as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth Congress (March 4, 1855-March 3, 1859); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of War (Thirty-fourth Congress); resumed the practice of law; member, State house of representatives 1859; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate in 1864; reelected in 1870 and served from March 4, 1865, to March 3, 1877; chairman, Committee on Engrossed Bills (Thirty-ninth Congress), Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expense (Fortieth and Forty-first Congresses), Committee on Naval Affairs (Forty-first and Forty-third Congresses), Committee on Railroads (Forty-third and Forty-fourth Congresses); appointed by President Rutherford Hayes as one of the commissioners for the purchase of the Hot Springs Reservation in Arkansas and served as chairman 1877-1879; died in Washington, D.C., May 10, 1898; interment in School Street Cemetery, Lebanon, N.H. 

February 6


1773: New Hampshire Town of Northwood is Incorporated

1804 - Born: Charles Hazen Peaslee ,  Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1847 - 1852.

Charles was  born in Gilmanton, N.H., on February 6, 1804; attended Gilmanton Academy, and was graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1824; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1828 and commenced practice in Concord, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives 1833-1837; adjutant general of the State militia 1839-1847; elected as a Democrat to the Thirtieth, Thirty-first, and Thirty-second Congresses (March 4, 1847-March 3, 1853); chairman, Committee on Militia (Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses); was not a candidate for re-nomination in 1852; collector of the port of Boston by appointment of President Pierce 1853-1857; moved to Portsmouth, N.H., in 1860; died while on a visit to St. Paul, Minn., on September 18, 1866; interment in Harmony Grove Cemetery, Portsmouth, N.H.

Charles Hazen Peaslee

1870: Born -  Sherman Everett Burroughs: ,  Represented  New Hampshire in Congress from 1917 - 1922

Sherman was born in Dunbarton, Merrimack County, N.H., February 6, 1870; attended the public schools, and was graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1894; private secretary to Congressman Henry M. Baker, 1894-1897; was graduated from the law school of Columbian College (now George Washington University), Washington, D.C., in 1896; was admitted to the bar in 1896 and commenced practice in Manchester, N.H., in 1897; member of the State house of representatives in 1901 and 1902; member of the State board of charities and corrections 1901-1907; member of the State board of equalization in 1909 and 1910; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-fifth Congress in a special election, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of United States Representative Cyrus A. Sulloway, and reelected to the two succeeding Congresses (May 29, 1917-January 27, 1923); declined to be a candidate for reelection to the Sixty-eighth Congress in 1922; died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1923; interment in Valley Cemetery, Manchester, N.H.

Sherman Everett Burroughs

February 7

1778 - Royal Governor John Wentworth sails for London

1834: Born - Henry Oakes Kent - Henry Oakes Kent was born in Lancaster, February 7, 1834. He attended the district school and Lancaster Academy, and graduated from Norwich Military University in the class of 1854, receiving later the degree of A. M. He studied law with Hon Jacob Benton, and was admitted to the bar at Lancaster in May, 1858. Soon after, he became the proprietor of the Coos Republican, and assumed the editorial and business management of that paper, his strong interest in political affairs and the fortunes of the Republican party, with which he was actively indentified, impelling him to this step, in taking which he relinquished the prospect of a successful and distinguished career at the bar. In the management of the Republican, both financial and editorial, he displayed rare skill and ability. His leading articles were always strong, vigorous, earnest, and secured for his paper, notwithstanding its remote location from the Capital, an influential position among the party journals of the state. It is safe to say that from the time when he assumed its management until 1870, when he sold it,—a period of twelve years,—no paper in the state rendered more efficient support to the party with which it was allied, or advocated more heartily all measures tending to advance the material prosperity of the section in which it was located, than did the Coos Republican under the direction of Col. Kent.

February 8

1772 - The New Hampshire Town of Bretton Woods was Granted to Sir Thomas Wentworth 

February 11

1786 - Born: Titus Brown (ALstead) - Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1825 - 1828

Titus Brown , a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Alstead, Cheshire County, N.H., February 11, 1786

Titus  graduated from Middlebury (Vt.) College in 1811; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Reading, Vt., in 1814; moved to Francestown, N.H., in 1817 and continued the practice of law; member of the State house of representatives 1820-1825; solicitor of Hillsborough County 1823-1825 and 1829-1834; elected as a Adams candidate to the Nineteenth and Twentieth Congresses (March 4, 1825-March 3, 1829); was not a candidate for reelection in 1828; member of the State senate and served as its president in 1842; chairman of the boards of bank and railroad commissioners at the time of his death; died in Francestown, N.H., January 29, 1849; interment in Mill Village Cemetery. 

Titus Brown, Nh State House Portrait

1820: Born (Portsmouth) - Thomas Logan Tullock. US Postmaster in Washington 1882

Thomas Logan Tullock - Postmaster 1882

February 12


1824: Destructive Freshet


February 13

1788 - A Constitutional Convention was held in Exeter to accept the Federal Constitution. New Hampshire would accept the Constition on June 21, 1788 and thereby be the deciding vote to Ratify the Constitution.

1849 - A massive fire swept through Concord NH

February 14

1764 - The New Hampshire Town of Franconia was Granted.

February 15

1898 - The USS Maine is destroyed in Havana Cuba

February 16

1752 - The New Hampshire Town of Walpole was Granted

February 17

1740: Born- John Sullivan - Governor of New Hampshire from 1786 - 1788, General in the Revolutionary War

John Sullivan, (brother of James Sullivan and father of George Sullivan), a Delegate from New Hampshire; born in Somersworth, N.H., February 17, 1740; received a limited education; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Durham in 1760; Member of the Continental Congress in 1774 and 1775; during the Revolution was appointed as a brigadier general; later promoted to major general, and from June 1775 until early in 1780; again a Member of the Continental Congress in 1780 and 1781; attorney general of New Hampshire 1782-1786; president of New Hampshire in 1786 and 1787; member of the state ratification convention in 1788; speaker of the state house of representatives; again chosen president of New Hampshire; appointed by President Washington judge of the United States District Court of New Hampshire in September 1789 and held that office until his death in Durham, N.H., January 23, 1795; interment in the Sullivan family cemetery.

February 18

1763 - The New Hampshire Town of New Boston was Incorporated

1855 - A large section of the Piscataqua Bridge was carried away by Ice

February 20


1915 - Born : Thomas James McIntyre, Represented New Hampshire in the US Senate from 1962 - 1979;

Thomas McIntyre wasborn in Laconia, Belknap County, N.H., February 20, 1915; attended public and parochial schools of Laconia; graduated from Manlius Military School, Manlius, N.Y., in 1933, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1937, and Boston (Mass.) University Law School in 1940; admitted to practice law before the New Hampshire Supreme Court in 1940; served in the United States Army 1942-1946; discharged as a major; mayor of Laconia, N.H., 1949-1951; city solicitor in 1953; unsuccessful candidate for Eighty-fourth Congress in 1954; elected in a special election on November 6, 1962, as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the unexpired term of Henry Styles Bridges ending January 3, 1967; reelected in 1966 for the full six-year term, and again in 1972 and served from November 7, 1962, until January 3, 1979; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1978; was a resident of Laconia, N.H., and Tequesta, Fla., until his death in Palm Beach, Fla., August 8, 1992; interment in St. Lambert Cemetery in Laconia.

Thomas McIntyre

February 22

1760 - The New Hampshire Town of Danville was Incorporated

1785 - The New Hampshire Town of Ossipee was Incorporated

February 23

1751 - Born: Henry Dearborn - 

Henry Dearborn was born in Hampton, New Hampshire, on 23 February 1751. He studied medicine under Dr. Hall Jackson in Portsmouth and then married Mary Bartlett in 1771.

Dearborn joined the military early in the Revolution and saw action at Bunker Hill. He served under Benedict Arnold in Quebec, was captured and then paroled in 1776. As a major, he fought at Ticonderoga and Freeman’s Farm with the 1st New Hampshire Regiment. He spent the winter of 1777-1778 at Valley Forge, and later fought at Monmouth, against the Six Nations, and at Yorktown.

In the succeeding years, he returned to Maine, became a major general of militia there, was appointed U.S. marshal for the district of Maine, served in the U.S. House of Representatives, served as Secretary of War and helped plan the removal of the Indians to the west of the Mississippi River.

From 27 January 1812 to 15 June 1815, Dearborn was the senior officer in the Army. He fought unspectacularly against the British in the northeast theater in the War of 1812. He then went to command New York, and soon left active service. In later life, he was the ambassador to Portugal from 1822 to 1824. He died at Roxbury, Massachusetts, on 6 June 1829.

1889 - Born John Winant , the sixty-ninth and seventy-second governor of New Hampshire, was born in New York City on February 23, 1889. His education was attained at St. Paul’s School in Concord, and later he attended Princeton University. His teaching career was temporarily interrupted when he enlisted in the American Expeditionary Force during World War I. Winant first entered politics in 1916, serving as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he was reelected to in 1922. He also served as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1921 to 1922. Winant next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1924. After losing his 1926 reelection bid, Winant was successful in both his 1930 and 1932 campaigns. During his tenure, the state banking commission was restructured; the state highway system was advanced; and an executive budget plan was initiated. Also, depression related relief measures were enacted; and Winant was the first governor to work together with the National Planning Board, as well as being the first to satisfy the Civilian Conservation Corps enrollment quota. After leaving the governorship, Winant secured an appointment to serve as the assistant director of the International Labor Organization in Geneva, a post he held in 1935 and again from 1937 to 1940. He also headed the newly created Social Security Administration Board; was the U.S. ambassador to Great Britain from 1941 to 1946; and served as the U.S. representative to the United Nations Economic and Social Council in 1946. During World War II, he served on the European Advisory Commission, as well as organizing the 1943 Moscow conference that resulted in the Teheran summit of Allied governments. After writing one volume of his memoirs, Governor John Winant committed suicide. He was buried at St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire.

February 24

1860 : Born Frank Rollins -  the fifty-sixth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Concord, New Hampshire on February 24, 1860. His early education was attained in the Concord public schools, and later he attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, graduating in 1881. He studied law at Harvard, and was admitted to the bar in 1882. Instead of practicing law, Rollins went to work in the family's banking firm. He eventually became the manager and vice-president of the Boston branch. Rollins also had a military career, starting in 1880 with service in the National Guard. He later served as an assistant adjutant general with the rank of lieutenant colonel, a post he held for five years. Rollins first entered politics in 1895, serving as a one-term member and president of the New Hampshire State Senate. He also was designated to give the New England delegation address to presidential nominee William McKinley. In 1898, Rollins secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and then went on to win the popular vote in the general election. During his tenure, the "old home week" festival was initiated; and tourism incentives were promoted. After leaving office, Rollins retired from political life. He stayed active, serving on several boards, as well as serving as trustee for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Governor Frank W. Rollins, who was the author of several books, passed away on October 27, 1915. He was buried in the Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire.

February 27

1852 - Born : John Mc Lane, the fifty-ninth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Lenoxtown, Scotland on February 27, 1852. When he was just a baby, his family moved to the United States, settling in Milford, New Hampshire. McLane's education was limited and attained in the public schools. After learning the cabinet making business, he opened his own successful furniture manufacturing business. He also became involved in the banking and insurance industries. McLane first entered politics as a one-term member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he won election to in 1855. He also chaired the insurance committee in 1887; was a member and president of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1891 to 1892 and 1893 to 1894; and was a delegate to the 1900 Republican National Convention. McLane next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1904. During his tenure, the state's road system was advanced; and the Russo-Japanese Peace Conference was held in Portsmouth. After leaving the governorship, McLane retired from politics. He returned to his various business interests, as well as becoming involved in civic affairs. Governor John McLane passed away on April 13, 1911, and was buried in the Milford Cemetery in Milford, New Hampshire

March 1

1774 - The New Hampshire Town of Millsfield was Incorporated

March 6

1856: Born - Charles Fox of Milton Mills NH

March 8

1893 - Born : Charles M Dale - CHARLES M. DALE, the seventy-sixth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Browns Valley, Minnesota on March 8, 1893. His education was attained at the University of Minnesota, where he earned a bachelor degree in 1915, and a law degree in 1917. During World War I, he served as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army's Artillery Coast Corps. After establishing his legal career in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Dale entered into politics. He won election in 1921, serving as the city solicitor for Portsmouth, a position he held two years. He served as mayor of Portsmouth from 1926 to 1928 and 1943 to 1944; and was a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1933 to 1937 and 1938 to 1939. He also served as senate president from 1935 to 1937; and was a member of the Governor's Council from 1937 to 1938. Dale next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1944. He won reelection to a second term in 1946. During his tenure, a state employees' retirement plan was created; tourism and the state's industry were both promoted; and the deficit was reduced. After completing his term, Dale retired from political life. He stayed active, working in the banking industry, as well as owning and operating the WHEB radio station. Governor Charles M. Dale passed away on September 28, 1978, and was buried in the Valley View Cemetery in Browns Valley, New Hampshire.

1912 - Born: Meldrim Thomson

Meldrim Thomson Jr. was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on March 8, 1912. He attended the University of Miami, Washington and Jefferson College, Mercer University and the University of Georgia, receiving a LL.B. from the latter. Thomson started a legal textbook publishing firm on Long Island, New York. In search of quiet, he moved his family of six children to Orford, where he founded Equity Publishing Corp. As governor from 1973-1979, serving three two-year terms, he drew devoted support from ultraconservatives with positions that included suggesting nuclear weapons for the state National Guard. He once called Martin Luther King "a man of immoral character whose frequent association with leading agents of communism is well-established." But he also drew votes for his strong antitax stance -- to this day, the state has neither an income tax nor a sales tax -- and for his philosophy of independence from federal influence. Thomson is a former member and chairman of both the Stony Brook, Long Island; and Orford, New Hampshire, school boards. He was a member of the New Hampshire constitutional convention in 1964. Thomson also co-founded Taxfighters, Incorporated, and the Public School Association. Thomson has taught political science at the University of Georgia. Governor Thomson passed away from Parkinson's disease and heart problems on April 19, 2001.

March 11

1834 : Born - George A. Ramsdell, the fifty-fifth governor of New Hampshire (1897 - 1899)

Georgewas born in Milford, New Hampshire on March 11, 1834. His education was attained at McCollom Institute and at Amherst College in Massachusetts. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1857, and then established his legal career in Peterborough. Ramsdell first entered politics as treasurer of Hillsborough County, a position he held from 1861 to 1862. He also was clerk of Hillsborough County from 1864 to 1887; and was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1869 to 1872. He served as a member of the 1876 State Constitutional Convention; and was a member of the Executive Council from 1891 to 1892. Ramsdell next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1896. During his tenure, the creation of a medical and surgical licensing board was promoted; troops were organized for the Spanish-American War; and state expenditures were controlled. After completing his term, Ramsdell retired from political life. Governor George A. Ramsdell passed away on November 16, 1900, and was buried in the Edgewood Cemetery in Nashua, New Hampshire.

March 13

1753 - Born : David Hough, a Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1803 - 1806

David Houghwas born in Norwich, Conn., March 13, 1753; attended the common schools; ship carpenter; moved to Lebanon, N.H., in 1778; member of the State house of representatives in 1788, 1789, and 1794; justice of the peace; colonel of militia; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1783; commissioner of valuation in 1798; elected as a Federalist to the Eighth and Ninth Congresses (March 4, 1803-March 3, 1807); engaged in agricultural pursuits; died in Lebanon, N.H., April 18, 1831; interment in the cemetery in the southern vicinity of Lebanon.

 

1872 - Born:  Walter Scott West      March 13, 1872 at Bradford, NH  Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

Earned The Medal of Honor During the Spanish-American War For heroism May 11, 1898 at Cienfuegos, Cuba

Died: September 14, 1943 at the age of 71

Walter West was one of 52 sailors and Marines cited for bravery and coolness in the face of enemy fire during the cutting of cables at Cienfuegos, Cuba on 11 May 1898. The mission was a daring operation to cut undersea cables linking the Spanish fortifications at Cienfuegos with the rest of the world. Destruction of the cables was ordered to disrupt communications. In two boats, sailors from the USS Nashville and the USS Marblehead were joined by a Marine guard as they moved within 15 feet of the enemy shore, under fire from the hidden enemy, to dredge up and cut two such cables. During the 80 minute operation, the cable cutting party was under constant enemy fire from a short range, while they coolly dredged the cables across the bow of their boats, then cut through them with hacksaws. When a cable was severed, the seaward end was transported back to the USS Marblehead, which then moved further from shore to drop the ends in deeper water and make repair impossible. So intense was the enemy presence, and so daring the American support, Captain Maynard of the Nashville was wounded in the action. With great courage, the mission was accomplished

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Private Walter Scott West, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action on board the U.S.S. Marblehead during the operation of cutting the cable leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, 11 May 1898. Facing the heavy fire of the enemy, Private West displayed extraordinary bravery and coolness throughout this action.

General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 521 (July 7, 1899)

Action Date: May 11, 1898           Service: Marine Corp              Rank: Private                           Division: U.S.S. Marblehead

March 14

1803 - First Town Meeting held in Milton New Hampshire

March 15

1766 - Born: Thomas Weston Thompson, a Representative and a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Boston, Mass., March 15, 1766; attended Dummer Academy, Byfield, Mass.; graduated from Harvard University in 1786; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1791 and practiced in Salisbury, N.H., 1791-1810; postmaster of Salisbury, N.H., 1798-1803; trustee of Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1801-1821; moved to Concord, N.H., in 1810 and continued the practice of law; member, State house of representatives 1807-1808, 1813-1814, and served as speaker 1813-1814; elected as a Federalist to the Ninth Congress (March 4, 1805-March 3, 1807); State treasurer of New Hampshire 1809-1811; elected to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Nicholas Gilman and served from June 24, 1814, to March 3, 1817; died in Concord, N.H., on October 1, 1821; interment in the Old North Cemetery. 

1869 - Born: John H. Bartlett, the sixty-sixth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Sunapee, New Hampshire on March 15, 1869. His education was attained at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1894. While studying law in Portsmouth, Bartlett taught school, as well as serving as a high school principal. In 1894 he was admitted to the bar, and then went on to establish a successful legal practice in Portsmouth. Bartlett also had a career as a public servant. He was the postmaster of Portsmouth from 1899 to 1907; served on Governor McLane's staff from 1905 to 1906; and was instrumental in making the preparations for the Russo-Japanese Peace Conference in Portsmouth. He also presided over the 1916 Republican State Convention; and served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1917 to 1918. Bartlett next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1918. During his tenure, the state employee liability law was improved; an executive budget plan was initiated; and legislation was enacted that granted cities the power to own and operate street railways. After declining to run for a second term, Bartlett secured an appointment to serve as president of the U.S. Civil Service Commission. He also served as first assistant U.S. postmaster-general in 1922; and was chairman of the U.S. section of the Joint International Commission for the U.S. and Canada, a post he held from 1929 to 1939. Governor John H. Bartlett, who was the author of several books, passed away on March 19, 1952. He was buried in the Harmony Grove Cemetery in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

1873 - Born: Rolland H. Spaulding, the sixty-fourth governor of New Hampshire, and brother of New Hampshire Governor Huntley Spaulding, was born in Townsend Harbor, Massachusetts on March 15, 1873. His education was attained at Phillips Academy, where he graduated in 1893. After working in the family's fiberboard business, Spaulding became interested in state politics, particularly with the state's progressive movement in 1905. He also served as a delegate to the 1912 Republican National Convention. Spaulding next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in the 1914 general election. During his tenure, municipal finances were improved; the state highway department was restructured; state agencies were run more efficiently; and reduction of the state tax was lobbied for. After declining to run for reelection, Spaulding retired from political life. He returned to his various business interests, as well as serving as president of the New Hampshire Defense League. Governor Rolland H. Spaulding passed away on March 14, 1942 in Rochester, New Hampshire.

March 16

1778 - The Town of Portsmouth NH decided to establish a Hospital for the care of citizens with Small-Pox.

1917 - Born: Louis Crosby Wyman, a Representative and a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H., March 16, 1917; graduated from the University of New Hampshire at Durham in 1938 and from the Harvard University Law School in 1941; admitted to the bar of Massachusetts and New Hampshire in 1941, and of Florida in 1957, and commenced the practice of law in Boston, Mass.; during the Second World War served in the Alaskan Theater as lieutenant in the United States Naval Reserve 1942-1946; general counsel to a United States Senate committee in 1946; secretary to Senator Styles Bridges in 1947; counsel, Joint Congressional Committee on Foreign Economic Cooperation 1948-1949; attorney general of New Hampshire 1953-1961; president, National Association of Attorneys General 1957; legislative counsel to Governor of New Hampshire 1961; member and chairman of several State legal and judicial commissions; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-eighth Congress (January 3, 1963-January 3, 1965); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1964 to the Eighty-ninth Congress; elected to the Ninetieth Congress; reelected to the three succeeding Congresses and served from January 3, 1967, until his resignation December 31, 1974; was not a candidate for reelection, but was a candidate in 1974 to the United States Senate for the six-year term commencing January 3, 1975; certified elected by the State of New Hampshire by a two vote margin; subsequently appointed December 31, 1974, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Norris Cotton, for the term ending January 3, 1975, and served from December 31, 1974, to January 3, 1975; due to the contested election of November 5, 1974, the United States Senate declared the seat, for the six-year term commencing January 3, 1975, vacant as of August 8, 1975; unsuccessful in a special September election to fill the vacancy; associate justice, New Hampshire Superior Court 1978-1987; was a resident of Manchester, N.H. and West Palm Beach, Florida, until his death due to cancer on May 5, 2002; remains were cremated and ashes scattered at sea. 

March 18

1797 - Born: James Wilson II, (son of James Wilson [1766-1839]) in Peterborough NH. Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1809 - 1810 and 1847 - 1850

Jamesattended the academies at New Ipswich, Atkinson, and Exeter; moved with his parents to Keene, N.H., in 1815; was graduated from Middlebury College in 1820; member of the State militia 1820-1840 and successively promoted from captain to major general; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1823 and commenced practice in Keene, Cheshire County, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives 1825-1837, 1840, and 1846, and served as speaker in 1828; unsuccessful candidate for Governor in 1835 and 1838; delegate to the Whig National Convention in 1840; surveyor general of public lands in the Territories of Wisconsin and Iowa 1841-1845; elected as a Whig to the Thirtieth and Thirty-first Congresses and served from March 4, 1847, to September 9, 1850, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Post Office Department (Thirtieth Congress); appointed one of the commissioners to settle private land claims in California in 1851 and served in this capacity until 1853; settled in San Francisco and remained there until 1867, when he returned to Keene, N.H.; again a member of the State house of representatives in 1871 and 1872; died in Keene, N.H., May 29, 1881; interment in Woodland Cemetery

March 19


1771 - Incorporated were the Counties of Cheshire, Grafton and Hillsborough

1771 - The New Hampshire County of Rockingham was Incorporated

March 20

1716 - The New Hampshire town of Stratham was Incorporated

March 21

1776 - John Langdon laid the Keel of the Continental Frigate - "Raleigh" - The New Hampshire State Seal

1787 - Born: John Page, the twenty-fifth governor of New Hampshire - 1839 - 1842.

Johnwas born in Haverhill, New Hampshire on May 21, 1787. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of his native state. During the War of 1812, he served as a lieutenant and participated in the protection of New Hampshire's frontier at Stewartstown. Page first entered politics in 1813, serving as selectman of Haverhill, a position he held fourteen consecutive terms. He served as an assistant U.S. tax assessor in 1815; was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1818 to 1820 and 1835; and served as the Grafton County register of deeds in 1827 and 1829 to 1835. He also served as a member of the U.S. Senate from 1836 to 1837; and was a member of the Governor's Executive Council in 1836 and 1838. Page next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor in the 1839 general election. He was reelected annually until 1841. During his tenure, the imprisonment debt law was eliminated; the state's first geological survey was authorized; funding was sanctioned for establishing a school for the blind; and the 1841 Webster-Ashburton treaty was negotiated. After completing his term, Page was instrumental in founding the state Republican Party. Governor John Page passed away on September 8, 1865, and was buried in the Ladd Street Cemetery in Haverhill, New Hampshire.

1951 - Born: Paul Hodes, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in New York City, New York County, N.Y., on March 21, 1951; A.B., Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1972; J.D., Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Mass., 1978; assistant attorney general of New Hampshire, 1979-1982; special prosecutor for the state of New Hampshire, 1992; lawyer, private practice; professional entertainer; unsuccessful candidate for election to One Hundred and Ninth Congress in 2004; elected as a Democrat to the One Hundred Tenth Congress and to the succeeding Congress (January 3, 2007-January 3, 2011); not a candidate for reelection, but was an unsuccessful candidate to the United States Senate in 2010. 

March 26

1876: Born - Robert Frost (Poet)

Robert Frost was born on March 26, 1874, in San Francisco, where his father, William Prescott Frost Jr., and his mother, Isabelle Moodie, had moved from Pennsylvania shortly after marrying. After the death of his father from tuberculosis when Frost was eleven years old, he moved with his mother and sister, Jeanie, who was two years younger, to Lawrence, Massachusetts. He became interested in reading and writing poetry during his high school years in Lawrence, enrolled at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1892, and later at Harvard University in Boston, though he never earned a formal college degree.

Frost drifted through a string of occupations after leaving school, working as a teacher, cobbler, and editor of the Lawrence Sentinel. His first published poem, “My Butterfly," appeared on November 8, 1894, in the New York newspaper The Independent.

In 1895, Frost married Elinor Miriam White, whom he’d shared valedictorian honors with in high school and who was a major inspiration for his poetry until her death in 1938. The couple moved to England in 1912, after they tried and failed at farming in New Hampshire. It was abroad that Frost met and was influenced by such contemporary British poets as Edward Thomas, Rupert Brooke, and Robert Graves. While in England, Frost also established a friendship with the poet Ezra Pound, who helped to promote and publish his work.

By the time Frost returned to the United States in 1915, he had published two full-length collections, A Boy’s Will (Henry Holt and Company, 1913) and North of Boston (Henry Holt and Company, 1914), and his reputation was established. By the 1920s, he was the most celebrated poet in America, and with each new book—including New Hampshire (Henry Holt and Company, 1923), A Further Range (Henry Holt and Company, 1936), Steeple Bush (Henry Holt and Company, 1947), and In the Clearing (Holt Rinehart & Winston, 1962)—his fame and honors (including four Pulitzer Prizes) increased.

Though his work is principally associated with the life and landscape of New England—and though he was a poet of traditional verse forms and metrics who remained steadfastly aloof from the poetic movements and fashions of his time—Frost is anything but merely a regional poet. The author of searching and often dark meditations on universal themes, he is a quintessentially modern poet in his adherence to language as it is actually spoken, in the psychological complexity of his portraits, and in the degree to which his work is infused with layers of ambiguity and irony.

In a 1970 review of The Poetry of Robert Frost, the poet Daniel Hoffman describes Frost’s early work as “the Puritan ethic turned astonishingly lyrical and enabled to say out loud the sources of its own delight in the world," and comments on Frost’s career as the “American Bard”: “He became a national celebrity, our nearly official poet laureate, and a great performer in the tradition of that earlier master of the literary vernacular, Mark Twain.”

About Frost, President John F. Kennedy, at whose inauguration the poet delivered a poem, said, “He has bequeathed his nation a body of imperishable verse from which Americans will forever gain joy and understanding.”

Robert Frost lived and taught for many years in Massachusetts and Vermont, and died in Boston on January 29, 1963.

1925: Vesta M. Roy -  born in Detroit, Michigan. She served as a Rockingham, County, New Hampshire Commissioner, and as a member of both the New Hampshire House of Representatives (1973-75) and Senate (1978-86). As President of the Senate, she assumed the office of governor briefly in an acting capacity upon the death of then-Governor Hugh Gallen shortly before the inauguration of Governor-elect John H. Sununu. Although she was governor for only one week, she holds the status of being the first Republican female governor in U.S. history. Roy was also an advisor to the New Hampshire presidential campaign offices of Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and George H.W. Bush. She died at her home in Kenmore, New York at the age of seventy-six and is buried in Lowell, Massachusetts

March 27

1747: Born - Alexander Scammell: Son of a prominent doctor, grew up in Mendon, Massachusetts, and graduated from Harvard in 1769. He studied law in the office of John Sullivan in Durham, New Hampshire, and as the Revolutionary War began he became a major in Sullivan's Brigade of the New Hampshire Militia. In October 1776, Scammell became Brigadier Major in Charles Lee's Division, and in November of that year he was promoted to Colonel of the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment. He was present at the evacuation of Ticonderoga, and led his regiment in the two battles of Saratoga. He became Washington's Aide de Camp and served as adjutant general from January 5, 1778, to January 1, 1781, and then resigned that post to take command of the 1st New Hampshire Regiment. In the Yorktown Campaign, he led 400 light infantry but was badly wounded, possibly after having been taken prisoner, and he died from his injuries in October 1881 after being released and brought behind the American lines.

1782 - The New Hampshire Town of Pittsfield was Incorporated.

March 28

1837: Born - Jacob Harold Gallinger, a Representative and a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada.

Jacob attended the common schools and completed an academic course; became a printer; studied medicine and graduated from the Cincinnati (Ohio) Medical Institute in 1858; studied abroad for two years; returned to the United States and engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Concord, N.H.; member, State house of representatives 1872-1873, 1891; member of the State constitutional convention in 1876; member, State senate 1878-1880; was surgeon general of New Hampshire, with the rank of brigadier general 1879-1880; elected as a Republican to the Forty-ninth and Fiftieth Congresses (March 4, 1885-March 3, 1889); declined to be a candidate for reelection in 1888; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate in 1891; reelected in 1897, 1903, 1909, and 1914, and served from March 4, 1891, until his death in Franklin, N.H., August 17, 1918; served as President pro tempore during the Sixty-second Congress; Republican Conference chairman (Sixty-third to Sixty-fifth Congresses); chairman, Committee on Transportation Routes to the Seaboard (Fifty-second Congress), Committee on Pensions (Fifty-fourth to Fifty-seventh Congress), Committee on the District of Columbia (Fifty-seventh to Sixty-second Congresses); chairman of the Merchant Marine Commission 1904-1905; interment in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, N.H. 

March 29

1771 - The New Hampshire Town of Dublin was Incorporated.

1936 - Born: John Anthony Durkin - Represented New Hampshire in the US Senate 1975 - 1980. born in Brookfield, Worcester County, Mass., March 29, 1936

John attended public schools; graduated from Holy Cross College, Worcester, 1959 and Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C., 1965; served in the United States Navy 1959-1961; admitted to New Hampshire and Massachusetts bars in 1966 and commenced practice in Concord, N.H.; served in office of New Hampshire attorney general 1966-1968; New Hampshire assistant attorney general 1967-1968; New Hampshire insurance commissioner 1968-1973; was a candidate for election in 1974 to the United States Senate for the six-year term commencing January 3, 1975; due to the contested election, the Senate declared the seat vacant as of August 8, 1975; elected as a Democrat, by special election, September 16, 1975, to fill the vacancy, and served from September 18, 1975, until his resignation December 29, 1980; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1980 and 1990; resumed the practice of law in New Hampshire; was a resident of Manchester, N.H.; died October 16, 2012. 

March 30

1840: Born - Charles Henry Sawyer (Watertown NY), the fiftieth governor of New Hampshire (1887 - 1889)

After his family moved to New Hampshire, young Sawyer attended the public schools in Dover, as well as the Franklin Academy. He then went to work, learning to run the Sawyer Woolen Mills Company, a business in which he served as president of in 1881. Sawyer first entered politics as a member of the Dover city council. He also served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1869 to 1871 and 1876 to 1878; was the aide-de-camp to Governor Charles Bell in 1881; and served as a delegate to the 1884 Republican National Convention. Sawyer next secured the 1887 Republican gubernatorial nomination. After a close popular election, the legislature named Sawyer the official governor. During his tenure, he represented the state in several national centennial ceremonies. Also, the Hazen railroad bill was vetoed; and the state's vacant U.S. senatorial seat was filled. After completing his term, Sawyer secured an appointment to represent the state at the Paris Exposition. Governor Charles H. Sawyer passed away on January 18, 1908 in Dover, New Hampshire.

1941: Born -  Robert C Smith, a Representative and a Senator from New Hampshire born in Trenton, N.J., March 30, 1941.

Robertattended public schools in Allentown and Trenton, N.J.; B.A., Lafayette College, Easton, Pa., 1965; served two years active duty in the United States Navy from 1965 to 1967 with one year of duty in Vietnam; also served five years in the Naval Reserve 1962-1965, 1967-1969; taught history, civics and English; owned and managed real estate business; unsuccessful candidate in 1982 for election to the Ninety-eighth Congress; elected as a Republican to the Ninety-ninth and to the two succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1985-January 3, 1991); resigned on December 7, 1990, upon his appointment to the United States Senate; appointed to the United States Senate on December 7, 1990, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Gordon Humphrey, and served for the remainder of the term ending January 3, 1991; elected to the United States Senate in 1990; reelected in 1996 and served from December 7, 1990, to January 3, 2003; unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 2002; chair, Select Committee on Ethics (One Hundred Fifth and One Hundred Sixth Congresses), Committee on Environment and Public Works (One Hundred Sixth Congress and One Hundred Seventh Congress [January 20-June 6, 2001]). 

March 31

1806: Born (Rochester New Hampshire) - John Parker Hale -  Representative New Hampshire in Congress from 1843 - 1845 and a US Senator from 1847 - 1853 , 1855 - 1865.

John wasborn in Rochester, Strafford County, N.H., March 31, 1806; received preparatory education at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H.; graduated from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, in 1827; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1830 and commenced practice in Dover, N.H.; member, State house of representatives 1832; appointed by President Andrew Jackson as United States attorney in 1834, and was removed by President John Tyler in 1841; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-eighth Congress (March 4, 1843-March 3, 1845); refused to vote for the annexation of Texas, although instructed to do so by the State legislature, which then revoked his renomination; elected as a Free Soil candidate to the United States Senate in 1846 and served from March 4, 1847, to March 3, 1853; unsuccessful candidate for President of the United States on the Free Soil ticket in 1852; again elected to the Senate in 1855 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Charles G. Atherton; reelected in 1859 and served from July 30, 1855, to March 3, 1865; chairman, Committee on Naval Affairs (Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Congresses), Committee on the District of Columbia (Thirty-eighth Congress); appointed Minister to Spain 1865-1869; returned to Dover, N.H., and died there November 19, 1873; interment in Pine Hill Cemetery. 

April 1

1737: Incorporated - New Hampshire Town of Kensington.


1840: Born  (Candia, New Hampshire) - Henry W. Rowe - Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor

Name:Henry Walker Rowe - Age at Enlistment:22 Enlistment Date:14 Aug 1862

 PRIVATE HENRY W. ROWE, of the Eleventh New Hampshire Volunteers, gives the following interesting description of how he won his Medal of Honor: " On the night of the 15th of June, 1864, Burnside with his Ninth Corps crossed the James River, and after a twenty-four hour march arrived at the outposts of Petersburg with the advance of his corps. At 6 P. M. an advance was made in the face of a murderous fire, and the Eleventh New Hampshire Volunteers, together with the Second Maryland, succeeded in getting close under a rebel battery. After several hours of continuous firing, during which many men were killed and wounded, the assault had to be given up. " Not discouraged by this first repulse, Burnside reconnoitered the lines and determined to make a second assault. The point chosen for the attack was a residence owned by Mr. Shand, a large two-story building shaded by buttonwood and gum trees, with a peach orchard in the rear. Fifty yards from the front door was a narrow ravine fifteen or twenty feet deep, with a brook flowing northward. West of the house about the same distance was another brook, the two joining twenty rods north of the house. A rebel brigade held this tongue of land with four guns. Their main line of breastworks was along the edge of the ravine east of the house. South, and on higher ground, was a redan with two guns, which enfiladed the ravine. " It was Burnside's idea to take this tongue of land, break the rebel line and compel the evacuation of the redan. General Potter's Division of the Ninth Corps was selected to carry out his plan, and the attacking column was to consist of General Griffin's brigade on the right, supported by Curtis' on the left. Griffin's brigade contained, all told, only 260 men, and in the front line the Eleventh New Hampshire found its place, including Company I with its remaining five privates. " A little past midnight General Potter led his division into the ravine in front of the house. The soldiers divested themselves of knapsacks, canteens and cups-everything which could make a noise-and moved forward stealthily. All was still and perfectly quiet. We reached the ravine, and there above us, not fifteen paces distant, were the rebel pickets. The night was warm and sultry. The sky was flecked by only a few light clouds, the moon becoming full and clear. Not a sound was heard, save the rumble of a wagon or a stray shot from the enemy's pickets. " Finally, a little past three, as the dawn was beginning to light up in the east, the command, 'Forward !' was passed along the line in whispers. " The men rose in a body from the ground; not a gunlock clicked; the bayonet was to do the work, Forward we started with steady, noiseless step. One bound and the rebel pickets were overpowered. Now toward the Shand House, and over the breastworks! At the right of the house, Comrade Batchelder, of Company I, joined me, and soon we fell in with 'Sol' Dodge, Sergeant of Company C. Passing the second corner of the house, we heard the report of a musket from a rebel pit about fifteen feet to the right. We ran around to the rear of this pit and shouted: 'Surrender, you damned rebels!' The 'Johnnies' were rather rudely awakened from their sleep, and although twenty- seven in number, dropped their guns. Guarded by our attacking force of three, they were finally turned over to the Union officers in the rear, together with a rebel flag captured by myself. The rebel line was broken and Grant's lines were drawn closer around Petersburg."

April 2

1746 - Incorporated - The New Hampshire Town of Merrimack

1823: Born - Samuel W. Hale , the forty-eighth governor of New Hampshire- Served from 1883 - 1885

Samuelwas born in Fitchburg, Massachusetts on April 2, 1823. His education was attained in the public schools of his native state. He established a successful career as a businessman, with interests in the banking, manufacturing, and railroad construction fields. Hale first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1866 to 1867. He also was a member of the Governor’s Council from 1869 to 1870, and was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1880. Hale next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in the 1883 general election. During his tenure, railroad reform measures were sanctioned. After completing his term, Hale retired from political life. He stayed active, returning to his various business interests. Governor Samuel W. Hale passed away on October 16, 1891, and was buried in the Greenlawn Cemetery in Keene, New Hampshire.

Samuel Hale, NH State House Portrait

April 6

1789 - Born: Isaac Hill, the twenty-fourth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts on April 6, 1788. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of his native state. At the age of fourteen, he went to work as an apprentice in the printing trade, and eventually became the owner and editor of the New Hampshire Patriot. Hill first entered politics as clerk of the New Hampshire State Senate, a position he held in 1819 and 1825. He served as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1820 to 1823 and 1827 to 1828; and was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in 1826. He also was the second comptroller of the U.S. treasury from 1829 to 1830; and served as a member of the U.S. Senate from 1831 to 1836. Hill next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1836. He was reelected to a second term in 1837, as well as to a third term in 1838. During his tenure, the state's railroads were improved; and the preservation of state documents was endorsed. After leaving the governorship, Hill continued to stay active in politics. From 1840 to 1841 he served as the U.S. subtreasurer at Boston. Afterwards he returned to his various publishing interests, as well as becoming involved in the real estate and banking industries. Governor Isaac Hill died in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire.

Isaac Hill Nh Governor - NH State House Portrait

April 8

1817 - Born: Walter Hariman - Governor of New Hampshire from 1867 - 1869

Walter Harrimanwas born in Warner, New Hampshire on April 8, 1817. His education was attained in academies at Henniker and Hopkinton, New Hampshire. Before entering into a political career, Harriman taught school for several years. He also studied and preached theology, as well as establishing a successful general store in Warner. Harriman first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1849 to 1850 and 1858 to 1859. He was the New Hampshire state treasurer from 1853 to 1854; was a pension office clerk in Washington, D.C. from 1855 to 1856; and served in the New Hampshire State Senate from 1859 to 1861. His political aspirations were temporarily interrupted with the outbreak of the Civil War. He served as a colonel in the 11th New Hampshire Volunteers, participating in the Battle of the Wilderness, where he was captured and later released, earning the rank of brevet brigadier general. After the war he returned to politics. From 1865 to 1867 he served as secretary of state for New Hampshire. Harriman next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in the 1867 general election. He won reelection to a second term in 1868. During his tenure, measures were taken to restore the state’s economy; education laws were revised; and teaching institutes were established. After leaving the governorship, Harriman secured a position as naval officer for the port of Boston, a post he held from 1869 to 1877. He also served again in the New Hampshire House of Representatives in 1881. Governor Walter Harriman, who was the author of several historical and travel books, passed away on July 25, 1884. He was buried in the Pine Grove Cemetery in Warner, New Hampshire.

April 10

1917: Born - Harl Pease Jr - Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor

World War II Congressional Medal of Honor recipient. Born in Plymouth, New Hampshire April 10, 1917.

Harl Pease Jr. enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1939. He served as a Captain in the 19th Bomb Group, U.S. Army Air Corps in the Pacific Theater. During a bombing mission over New Guinea on August 5, 1942 one of the engines on his B-17 bomber failed, forcing him to return to an Australian base. There, he selected an aircraft deemed unready for combat missions, but air worthy. Leaving early in the morning, he flew throughout the day, and rejoined his squadron at Port Moresby, New Guinea. On August 07, 1942, the squadron took off for an attack on a Japanese held airfield near Rabaul, New Britain. The squadron was attacked by about thirty enemy aircraft before reaching their target. He being on the wing of the squadron was able to shoot down several Zeroes and managed to drop his bomb load on the hostile base. His plane was damaged in the attack and fell behind the squadron. The enemy succeeded in igniting one of his bomb bay tanks which he jettisoned, but it was believed that he and his crew were eventually shot down, as they did not return to the home base. In September 1942, a Roman Catholic Priest, Father George Lepping was taken as a prisoner to a Japanese camp near Rabaul. He reported that he found Captain Pease and one his crewmen at the prison camp. Father Lepping reported that Captain Pease, three Americans and two Australian prisoners were taken into the jungle, were forced to dig their own graves and executed by the sword. On December 2, 1942, the Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Flying Cross with an Oak Leaf Cluster, and the Air Medal was posthumously awarded by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Mr. and Mrs. Harl Pease Sr. 


For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy on 6–7 August 1942. When 1 engine of the bombardment airplane of which he was pilot failed during a bombing mission over New Guinea, Capt. Pease was forced to return to a base in Australia. Knowing that all available airplanes of his group were to participate the next day in an attack on an enemy-held airdrome near Rabaul, New Britain, although he was not scheduled to take part in this mission, Capt. Pease selected the most serviceable airplane at this base and prepared it for combat, knowing that it had been found and declared unserviceable for combat missions. With the members of his combat crew, who volunteered to accompany him, he rejoined his squadron at Port Moresby, New Guinea, at 1 a.m. on 7 August, after having flown almost continuously since early the preceding morning. With only 3 hours' rest, he took off with his squadron for the attack. Throughout the long flight to Rabaul, New Britain, he managed by skillful flying of his unserviceable airplane to maintain his position in the group. When the formation was intercepted by about 30 enemy fighter airplanes before reaching the target, Capt. Pease, on the wing which bore the brunt of the hostile attack, by gallant action and the accurate shooting by his crew, succeeded in destroying several Zeros before dropping his bombs on the hostile base as planned, this in spite of continuous enemy attacks. The fight with the enemy pursuit lasted 25 minutes until the group dived into cloud cover. After leaving the target, Capt. Pease's aircraft fell behind the balance of the group due to unknown difficulties as a result of the combat, and was unable to reach this cover before the enemy pursuit succeeded in igniting 1 of his bomb bay tanks. He was seen to drop the flaming tank. It is believed that Capt. Pease's airplane and crew were subsequently shot down in flames, as they did not return to their base. In voluntarily performing this mission Capt. Pease contributed materially to the success of the group, and displayed high devotion to duty, valor, and complete contempt for personal danger. His undaunted bravery has been a great inspiration to the officers and men of his unit.

April 12

1838: Born - John B. Smith, the fifty-third governor of New Hampshire, was born in Saxtons River, Vermont on April 12, 1838. His education was attained at the Francestown Academy, and in the public schools of Hillsborough, New Hampshire. Before entering into politics Smith established a successful career as a businessman. He owned the Contoocook Mills Company, as well as developing holdings in the real estate and banking industries. Smith first entered politics in 1884, serving both as a presidential elector and an alternate delegate to the Republican National Convention. From 1887 to 1889 he served as a member of the Governor's Council; and in 1890 he was chairman of the Republican State Committee. Smith next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in the 1892 general election. During his tenure, several Republican appointments were made to the labor and forestry commissions; and the county controlled asylum system was eliminated. After completing his term, Smith retired from political life. He continued to stay active in his various business interests. Governor John B. Smith passed away on August 10, 1914 in Hillsborough, New Hampshire.

1840 - Born:Charles Dearborn Copp in Warren NH. Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor recipient. He was a Second Lieutenant with Company C, 9th New Hampshire Infantry and was awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism at Fredericksburg, Virginia. His official CMOH citation reads as follows: Seized the regimental colors, the color bearer having been shot down, and, waving them, rallied the regiment under a heavy fire. Rank and Organization: Second Lieutenant, Company C, 9th New Hampshire Infantry. Place and Date: At Fredericksburg, Va., 13 December 1862. Entered Service At: Nashua, N.H. Born: 12 April 1840, Warren County, N.H. Date of Issue: 28 June 1890. 

1879 - Born: Fred Herbert Brown, a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Ossipee, Carroll County, N.H., April 12, 1879

Fred Brown attended the public schools and Dow Academy, Franconia, N.H., Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., and Boston University School of Law; admitted to the bar in 1907 and commenced practice in Somersworth, N.H.; city solicitor 1910-1914; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1912; mayor of Somersworth, N.H. 1914-1922; United States attorney for the district of New Hampshire 1914-1922; Governor of New Hampshire 1923-1924; member of the New Hampshire Public Service Commission 1925-1933; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1933, to January 3, 1939; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1938; appointed Comptroller General of the United States by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in April 1939 and served until his resignation on June 19, 1940; served as a member of the United States Tariff Commission 1940-1941; retired from public and political activities; died in Somersworth, N.H., February 3, 1955; interment in Ossipee Cemetery, Ossipee, N.H. 

1918 - Born: Harrison R. Thyng ,Laconia, N.H.(1918).

Harrison Thyng was reared in Barndtead, N.H., and he graduated from Pittsfield High School in 1935 as valedictorian of his class. He graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 1939 with a bachelor of arts degree and a reserve commission as 2nd Lieutenant, Infantry, in the United States Army.

After his graduation he enlisted in the Army Air Corps as a flying cadet. He won his wings in March 1940, and was assigned to duty with the 94th Squadron, lst Pursuit Group at Selfridge, Mich. With the entry of the United States into World War II, First Lieutenant Thyng was assigned as commanding officer of the 309th Fighter Squadron, 31st Fighter Group, and sent to England. The British equipped this group with Spitfires, and Lieutenant Thyng led the first American fighter raids out of England.

This group was subsequently transferred secretly to Gibraltar and it opened up the air offensive of the North Africa invasion. Upon completion of the conquest of North Africa, Thyng (now a lieutenant colonel and commander of the 31st Fighter Group) was wounded and returned to the United States. He was an air ace with eight kills and 162 missions to his credit.

A few months later he was promoted to colonel and assigned as commanding officer of the 413th Long Range Fighter Group which he activated and trained. This group made the first single-engine fighter-plane crossing of the Pacific from Hawaii to Ie Shima. From here, Colonel Thyng led missions of P-47N's escorting B-29s over Japan, Korea and China. (One of his 22 escort missions was during the A-bomb dropping an Nagasaki). At the and of the war Colonel Thyng was transferred to the United States, and in 1946 he was commissioned as a regular officer in the U.S. Air Force.

From September 1947, to May 1950, Colonel Thyng was an Air National Guard instructor. During this time he organized the Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont Air National Guard. He began flying jet fighter aircraft in 1948, and he commanded the jet-equipped 33rd Fighter Wing until 1951 when he was assigned as commanding officer of the 4th Fighter Wing in Korea. During this time he flew a total of 113 combat missions in the F-86 with seven kills to his credit.

Brigadier General Thyng has air victories over German, French, Italian, Japanese and Russian aircraft. He is one of six men who are both conventional and jet aces.

Brigadier General Thyng has served in Air Defense Command as a fighter interceptor group and wing commander, Western Air Defense Force director of operations, air division vice commander, air division commander and sector commander. His jet fighter experience includes the F-80, F-84, F-86, F-89, F-94, F-100, F-102 and F-106. Brigadier General Thyng is now stationed at North Bay, Ontario, Canada, where he is vice commander of the Northern NORAD Region and commander of U.S. Air Force Detachment 5, 4608 Support Squadron (ADC).

After his military retirement, he ran as the Republican candidate for the US Senate seat from New Hampshire held by Democrat Thomas J. McIntyre but was defeated in the general election. He was the founder of the New England Aeronautical Institute which later merged with Daniel Webster Junior College to become Daniel Webster College in Nashua, New Hampshire, and served as its first president. He retired to Pittsfield, New Hampshire and died there at the age of 65. In July 2004, a memorial in his honor was dedicated in Pittsfield by the Pittsfield

April 20

1850 - Born: Daniel Chester French in Exeter NH.

Daniel Chester French was born in Exeter, N.H. He grew up in Concord, Mass., and came under the influence of the intellectual circle of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Louisa May Alcott. French chose to become a sculptor early in life and had the benefit of study with the painter William Morris Hunt and the sculptors William Rimmer and John Q.A. Ward—a particularly fortuitous group of instructors because of the variety of their esthetic approaches and their sympathetic professionalism.

With Emerson's assistance in 1874 French received the commission for the statue Minute Man for Concord. This immediately brought him fame. Though based upon the classical Apollo Belvedere, the sculpture was totally in keeping with the then-advanced style of historical bronze monuments. In 1876 French went to Italy and studied with Thomas Ball, whose work combined the neoclassic heritage and the new naturalism.

Some of French's first works on his return to the United States were not unlike the plaster groups of John Rogers. However, French gained fame principally through the large public monuments he created for the custom houses in St. Louis and Philadelphia, the Boston Post Office, and, above all, the gigantic statue, The Republic, that dominated the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.

French evolved a type of allegorical figure which became his trademark, although it was emulated by other sculptors. This was the statuesque, somewhat sexless female in long flowing gown, as in the Alma Mater at Columbia University or the Spirit of Life at the Spencer Trask Memorial at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The heavy, voluminous drapery often flowed over the heads of these figures as well, as can be seen in his most eloquent and personal work, Angel of Death and the Young Sculptor, a memorial to his friend and fellow sculptor Martin Milmore, who died young. The figure of Death confronts an idealized sculptor, who is at work on a relief of a sphinx.

French's best-known works are his two statues of Abraham Lincoln. The first, a standing Lincoln in Lincoln, Nebr., is similar to one by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in Chicago. The second, completed in 1922, and French's most famous sculpture, is the seated Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., done as one of several collaborative works with architect Henry Bacon.

April 22

1806 - Born: Moody Currier - The forty-ninth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Boscawen New Hampshire on April 22, 1806. His education was attained at an academy in Hopkinton, and at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1834. After working as an editor and teacher, Currier studied law. He established his legal career in Manchester, but after a few years of practicing, became involved in the banking and railroad industries. Currier first entered politics as clerk of the New Hampshire State Senate, a position he held from 1843 to 1844. He also served as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1856 to 1857, serving as president of the senate in 1857. From 1860 to 1861 he served on the Governor's Council. He also was chairman of the war committee; and served as a presidential elector in 1876. Currier next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1885. During his tenure, fiscal measures were initiated to lessen the state's declining economy; and legislation was sanctioned that mandated insurance companies to reimburse policy owners the entire value of their policies. After leaving the governorship, Currier retired from political life. Governor Moody Currier passed away on August 23, 1898, and was buried in the Valley Cemetery in Manchester, New Hampshire.

1832 - Born : Edward Cross (Lancaster) Civil War Union Army Officer, Veteran of Gettysburg - New Hampshire Fighting Fifth.

In the mid 1800’s Edward Crosswas a Washington correspondent and wrote articles for newspapers such as the New York Herald. He also worked several times as a US Army Scout in the Arizona Territory where he established the territory's first newspaper and had mining interest. With the outbreak of the Civil War, he returned east and was commissioned a Colonel in command of the 5th New Hampshire Infantry, Union Army. He soon gained a reputation as skilled leader in front of his corps, also being wounded in battles to include at Seven Pines, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. On July 2, 1863, during the Battle of Gettysburg, he led a brigade in 1st Division, II Corps. His division was sent to the left flank to help stabilize it after the Confederates had begun attacking. Cross's brigade was formed on the left of the division's III Corps battle line, when he was mortally wounded while at the left of his line near the Rose Woods. He died the next day in a field hospital and body was shipped home to Lancaster, New Hampshire. 

Colonel Edward Cross, NH State House Portrait

April 23

1764 - The New Hampshire Town of Lyndeborough was Incorporated

1866: Born -Reed, Eugene Elliott Reed - , Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1913 - 1914;

Eugene was born in Manchester, N.H., April 23, 1866; attended the public schools and received instruction from private tutors; studied law; director and officer of numerous New England and New York corporations and engaged in construction contracting business; alderman of Manchester 1899-1903 and mayor 1903-1911; Democratic National and State committeeman for twelve years; delegate to Democratic National Conventions in 1908, 1912, 1916, and 1924; unsuccessful candidate for election in 1910 to the Sixty-second Congress; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-third Congress (March 4, 1913-March 3, 1915); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1914 to the Sixty-fourth Congress; appointed by President Wilson on the Philippine Commission and served as secretary of commerce and police in 1916; negotiated the purchase and was first president under the Philippine ownership of Manila railroads; returned to the United States in 1918; unsuccessful candidate for United States Senator in 1918; engaged in the general export business in New York 1919-1922; vice president of United Life & Accident Insurance Co., Concord, N.H., 1922-1931; National Recovery Administration director for New Hampshire in 1933 and 1934; State director, National Emergency Council and Federal Housing Agency 1934-1939; member, New Hampshire Emergency Flood Relief and Rehabilitation Committee in 1936; member New Hampshire Disaster Relief Committee in 1938; regional director for New England, Office of Government Reports, in 1939 and 1940; died at Manchester, N.H., December 15, 1940; interment in Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Eugene Elliot Red, NH Congressman

April 25

1776 - Born: General James Miller: 

James Miller (25 April 1776 – 7 July 1851)  first Governor of Arkansas Territory, and a Brigadier General in the United States Army during the War of 1812.

James Miller was born in Peterborough, New Hampshire. He started a law practice at Greenfield, New Hampshire in 1803. He joined the New Hampshire state militia and commanded an artillery unit, until General Benjamin Pierce noticed him and recommended that he be commissioned as a Major in the regular army. Miller joined with the 4th United States Infantry.

In 1811 Miller's unit went to fight Indians in Vincennes, Indiana, where he was promoted to Colonel. In May 1812 his regiment moved to Detroit, Michigan. He was the commander during the Battle of Maguaga. Shortly afterwards, Miller was taken prisoner in 1813 and was later exchanged.

In 1814, Miller was Colonel of the 21st Infantry Regiment and led his men in the capture of the British artillery at the Battle of Lundy's Lane. His "I will try sir!" quote became famous and he earned the name of "Hero of Lundy's Lane".

Miller was made a Brigadier General by the U.S. Congress after the battle but soon left the army in 1819.

He served as territorial Governor of Arkansas from 1819 to 1825. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1824 but never took office.

Miller died of a stroke at Temple, New Hampshire.

Miller County, Arkansas is named for James Miller.

1841 - Born: Luther Franklin McKinney - Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1887 - 1888 & 1891 - 1892

 Luther wasborn in Newark, Licking County, Ohio, April 25, 1841; attended common and private schools; taught school; during the Civil War enlisted in Company D, First Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, August 5, 1861, and served until February 1863; moved to Iowa in 1865, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits and also taught school until 1867; was graduated from St. Lawrence University, Canton, N.Y., June 30, 1870; moved to Bridgton, Maine, in 1871, where he was ordained a pastor of the Universalist Church; moved to Newfields, N.H., in 1873, and subsequently, in 1875, to Manchester, N.H., pursuing his ministerial duties in both places; unsuccessful candidate for election in 1884 to the Forty-ninth Congress; elected as a Democrat to the Fiftieth Congress (March 4, 1887-March 3, 1889); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1888 to the Fifty-first Congress; elected to the Fifty-second Congress (March 4, 1891-March 3, 1893); was not a candidate for renomination in 1892; unsuccessful candidate for Governor of New Hampshire in 1892; United States Minister to Colombia, South America, 1893-1897; returned to Bridgton, Maine, and engaged in the furniture business; member of the State house of representatives in 1907 and 1908; again pastor of the Universalist Church at Bridgton, Cumberland County, Maine, and served until his death there on July 30, 1922; interment in Forest Hill Cemetery

1902 - Commodore Perkins Statue unveiled in Concord NH

April 27

1768 - Born: Jeremiah Mason - a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Lebanon, New London County, Conn., April 27, 1768; graduated from Yale College in 1788; studied law; moved to Vermont and was admitted to the bar in 1791; moved to New Hampshire and practiced law; attorney general of New Hampshire 1802-1805; elected June 8, 1813, as a Federalist to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy in the term beginning March 4, 1813, and served from June 21, 1813, until June 16, 1817, when he resigned; member, State house of representatives 1820-1821, 1824; president of the Portsmouth branch of the United States Bank 1828-1829; moved to Boston, Mass., in 1832; retired from the practice of law in 1838, but continued as chamber counsel up to the time of his death in Boston, Mass., October 14, 1848; interment in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass. 

May 1

1772 - The New Hampshire Town of Dorchester was Granted.

Dorchester New Hampshire Granted May 1, 1772

May 3

1775 - Letter from General Alexander Scammell to General John Sullivan after the Battle at Lexington.

1784 - Born: Henry Hubbard, the twenty-sixth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Charlestown, New Hampshire . His early education was attained through home tutoring, and later at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1803. He studied law and then established his legal career in his hometown of Charlestown. Hubbard first entered politics in 1810, serving as town moderator, a position he held sixteen times. He served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1812 to 1815, 1819 to 1820 and 1823 to 1827; was speaker of the house from 1825 to 1827; and served as selectman in 1819, 1820 and 1828. From 1823 to 1828 he served as the state solicitor for Cheshire County, and from 1827 to 1829 was the Sullivan County probate judge. He also served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1829 to 1835, as well as serving as a member of the U. S. Senate from 1835 to 1841. Hubbard next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1842. He was reelected to a second term in 1843. During his tenure, the elimination of capital punishment was lobbied for; and tax reduction was advocated for women who owned property. After leaving the governorship, Hubbard continued to stay politically active. He served as U.S. sub-treasurer in Boston, a post he held from 1846 to 1849. Governor Henry Hubbard passed away on June 5, 1857, and was buried in the Forest Hill Cemetery in Charlestown, New Hampshire.


May 4

1777 - Amos Shepard from Alstead NH was commissioned as a Captain in the Continental Army by President Weare of NH

May 5

1784 - A letter requesting the building of a road from Long Lane (Lafayette Road) to the Rye Meeting House was presented

May 8

1799 - Born: Samuel Dinsmoor Jr. - The thirtieth governor of New Hampshire and son of New Hampshire Governor Samuel Dinsmoor, was born in Keene, New Hampshire on May 8, 1799. His education was attained at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1814. He studied law, and then established his legal career, serving several years as a legal assistant to Arkansas Territorial Governor James Miller. Dinsmoor first entered politics as clerk of the New Hampshire State Senate, a position he held in 1826, 1827, 1829 and 1830. He also was a commissioner that facilitated French General Lafayette visit to New Hampshire in 1825. Dinsmoor next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1849. He was reelected to a second term in 1850, as well as to a third term in 1851. During his tenure, the state militia was restructured; the states' authority to govern corporations was lobbied for; and the open disclosure of state railroad funds was supported. After leaving the governorship, Dinsmoor retired from political life. He continued to stay active in his legal and banking interests. Governor Samuel Dinsmoor Jr. passed away in Keene on February 24, 1869.

May 9

1765 - The New Hampshire Town of Raymond was Incorporated.

Raymond NH - Incorporated May 9 1765

1829: Born - Phineas P Bixby (Piermont NH)- Commander of the 6th New Hampshire Volunteers.

A tradesman in Concord when the Civil War began. He was commissioned Adjutant of the 6th New Hampshire Infantry November 30, 1861. Wounded and taken prisoner at the Second Battle of Bull
Run,Virginia August 29, 1862, Bixby was for some weeks confined at Libby Prison before being exchanged, October 3, 1862. He rejoined the
Sixth, and on October 15, 1862 Bixby was commissioned major, to replace O.G. Dort who had resigned. After the death of Lieutenant Colonel Pearson at North Anna,Virginia on May 26,
1864, Bixby was in command of the regiment for some time. The Sixth was in the siege of Petersburg,Virginia and Bixby was wounded twice in events leading up to Petersburg. The second time he was wounded so severely that it was three months before he came back to the Sixth. In his absence he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and after his return he was again in
charge of the regiment most of the time. He was appointed Colonel, February 21, 1865. On April 2, 1865 Bixby was formally put in charge of the brigade, and he remained in charge until Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House. mustered out with his regiment on September 17, 1865.He also received the Brevet appointment of Colonel of United States Volunteers, for gallant and highly meritorious conduct in the assault before Petersburg, Virginia, to date from April 2, 1865

May 10

1722 - The New Hampshire town of Barrington was Incorporated.

Barrington NH Incorporated May 10, 1722

1722 - The New Hampshire Town of Nottingham was Incorporated

Nottingham NH Incorporated May 10, 1722

1722 - The New Hampshire Town of Rochester was Incorporated (Became a City in 1891)

Rochester NH Incorporated May 10, 1722

May 11

1750 - The New Hampshire Town of Salem (Rockingham County) was Incorporated

1900 - Born: Norris H Cotton (Warren NH) - Born on a farm in Warren, Grafton County, N.H., May 11, 1900; attended Phillips Exeter Academy at Exeter, N.H.; graduated from Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., in 1923; editor of the Granite Monthly; clerk of the State senate; aide to United States Senator George Moses; attended the law school of George Washington University, Washington, D.C.; admitted to the bar in 1928 and commenced practice in Lebanon, N.H.; member, State house of representatives 1923, 1943, 1945, serving as majority leader in 1943 and speaker in 1945; elected as a Republican to the Eightieth Congress and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from January 3, 1947, until his resignation November 7, 1954, having been elected to the United States Senate; elected on November 2, 1954, as a Republican to the United States Senate to complete the unexpired term caused by the death of Charles W. Tobey for the term ending January 3, 1957; reelected in 1956, 1962, and again in 1968, and served from November 8, 1954, until his resignation December 31, 1974; was not a candidate for reelection in 1974; chairman, Republican Conference (1973-75); subsequently appointed to the seat August 8, 1975, to fill the vacancy caused by the contested election of November 5, 1974, and served from August 8, 1975, until September 18, 1975; was a resident of Lebanon, N.H., until his death, February 24, 1989; interment in First Congregational Church Cemetery. 

May 16

1861 - General John Adams Dix was commissioned a Major-General in the US Army.

General John Adams Dix

May 17

1775 - The Fourth Provincial Congress assembled in Exeter NH.

4th Provincial Congress - Exeter NH May 17, 1775

1817 - Born - William Bradley Small. A Representative from New Hampshire; born in Limington, Maine, May 17, 1817; moved with his parents to Ossipee, N.H.; attended the public schools and Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H.; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1846 and commenced practice in Newmarket, N.H.; solicitor of Rockingham County, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives in 1865; served in the State senate in 1870; elected as a Republican to the Forty-third Congress (March 4, 1873-March 3, 1875); was not a candidate for renomination in 1874; resumed the practice of law and also engaged in banking; died in Newmarket, N.H., April 7, 1878; interment in Riverside Cemetery. 

May 18

1930: Born - Warren Bruce Rudman - Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., May 18, 1930; attended the public schools of Nashua, N.H.; graduated, Valley Forge Military School, Wayne, Pa., 1948; graduated, Syracuse University, Syracuse, N.Y., 1952; graduated, Boston College Law School, Boston, Mass., 1960; served in the United States Army Infantry 1952-1954; admitted to the New Hampshire bar in 1960 and commenced practice in Nashua; served as legal counsel to the Governor 1970; attorney general of New Hampshire 1970-1976; practiced law, Manchester, N.H., 1976-1980; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate on November 4, 1980, for the six-year term commencing January 3, 1981; subsequently appointed by the Governor on December 29, 1980, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John A. Durkin for the term ending January 3, 1981; reelected in 1986 and served from December 29, 1980, to January 3, 1993; was not a candidate for reelection in 1992; chairman, Select Committee on Ethics (Ninety-ninth Congress); resumed the practice of law in Washington, D.C.; appointed by President William Clinton as member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board in 1993 and served until 2001, serving as chairman 1995-2001; chairman, Special Oversight Board for Department of Defense Investigations of Gulf War Chemical and Biological Incidents 1998; co-chair, U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century 2001; co-founder, The Concord Coalition; died in Washington, D.C., on November 19, 2012. 

May 19

1773 - The New Hampshire Town of Fitzwilliam (Cheshire County), Was Incorporated

Fitzwilliam NH, Incorporated May 19, 1773

May 20

1727 - The New Hampshire Town of Bow (Merrimack County) was Incorporated

1828: Born - Natt Head, the forty-sixth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Hooksett, New Hampshire on May 20, 1828. His education was attained at Pembroke Academy. After working in the family's lumber and farming business, Head established a successful construction company that focused on railroad development in the state. He also became involved in the banking and insurance industries. Head first entered politics in 1861, serving as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held again in 1862. He also served as the state adjutant general from 1864 to 1870; and was elected to the New Hampshire State Senate in 1874, but due to a ballot name technicality, was denied a seat. However, in 1876 and 1877 he successfully won election to the senate, where he also served as senate president in the latter term. Head next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected by a popular vote, becoming the first governor to serve a two-year term. During his tenure, a child's labor law was sanctioned; a new state prison was opened; and legislation was enacted that required a telegraph in all railroad stations. After completing his term, Head retired from political life. He stayed active, returning to his various business interests. Governor Nathaniel Head passed away in Hooksett on November 12, 1883.

Governor Natt Head NH State House Portraits

May 23

1862: Born - Henry W. Keyes, the sixty-fifth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Newbury, Vermont on May 23, 1862. His education was attained at Harvard University, where he graduated in 1887. Keyes became a successful cattle breeder, and was credited with the initiating the Holstein-Friesian breed in the United States. He also was instrumental in founding the Woodsville National Bank in 1897. Keyes first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1891 to 1895 and 1915 to 1917. He also served in the New Hampshire State Senate from 1903 to 1905; was the treasurer of the State License Commission from 1903 to 1915; and served as chairman of the State Excise Commission from 1915 to 1917. Keyes next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1916. During his tenure, several World War I measures were implemented; a state library commission was established; a stock fraud protection law was enacted; and the Boston and Maine Railroad restructure plan was initiated. While still in office, Keyes won election to the U.S. Senate, a position he held from 1919 to 1937. Governor Henry W. Keyes passed away on June 19, 1938, and was buried in the Oxbow Cemetery in Newbury, Vermont.

May 25

1742 - The New Hampshire Town of South Hampton was Incorporated

May 26

1813: Born - George Gilman Fogg - a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Meredith Center, Belknap County, N.H., May 26, 1813; pursued classical studies and graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1839; studied law at Meredith and at the Harvard Law School; admitted to the bar in 1842 and commenced practice at Gilmanton Iron Works, N.H.; moved to Concord in 1846; member, State house of representatives 1846; secretary of State of New Hampshire 1846; newspaper publisher 1847-1861; reporter of the State supreme court 1856-1860; secretary of the Republican National Executive Committee in 1860; appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as Minister Resident to Switzerland 1861-1865; appointed as a Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Daniel Clark and served from August 31, 1866, to March 3, 1867; was not a candidate for election to the Senate in 1866; editor of the Concord Daily Monitor; died in Concord, N.H., October 5, 1881; interment in Blossom Hill Cemetery.

May 27

1823 - Born: General John G Foster in Whitefield New Hampshire.

June 2

1843: Born - William L.S. Tabor - Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He served as a Private in the Union Army in Company K, 15th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for action at Port Hudson, Louisiana in July 1863. His citation reads "Voluntarily exposed himself to the enemy only a few feet away to render valuable services for the protection of his comrades."

June 4

1744: Born - Jeremy Belknap

Jeremywas a liberal Congregational minister and historian, and graduated from Boston Latin School, and Harvard University in 1762. He taught school in several places before he began the study of theology.  In 1767 he began his profession as a preacher in Dover New Hampshire at a Congregational Church, and bought a house.

On 5 June 1767 he was married (by Rev. Andrew Eliot) to Ruth Eliot in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA. He remained there twenty years. In 1787 he moved back to Boston as pastor of the Federal Street Church, (considered a liberal Congregational Church, and later an early Unitarian Universalist congregation) where he remained until his death.

During the American Revolution he was a member of the Dover, New Hampshire militia (1775), and was called to the Siege of Boston. He remained with that group as chaplain.

He researched and compiled a variety of books with great care and reliability for the time including the “History of New Hampshire (1784-1792), in which he compiled the first animal census for our state.  In 1792 he wrote “A Discourse Intended to Commemorate the Discovery of America by Columbus” about Christopher Columbus (possibly he was the first American do to so). He also wrote “American Biography.” In 1792 he wrote, “The Foresters, An American Tale.” In 1795 he wrote “Sacred Poetry.”   In 1794 he was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the first such society in the United States. William Cullen Bryant, the poet and editor, said that Belknap possessed “the high merit of being the first to make American history attractive.”

In January of 1785 Rev. Belknap received a letter from George Washington, thanking him for the receipt of the first volume of history of New Hampshire.

In 1784 he was elected to the American Philosophical Society, and in 1786 to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1792 he was an overseer of Harvard College.

Jeremy Belknap NH State House Portrait

June 5

1861 - Born: Charles M. Floyd, the sixtieth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Derry, New Hampshire on June 5, 1861. His education was attained at the Pinkerton Academy. Floyd became a successful businessman with holdings in retail sales, as well as in the banking and commodities industries. He first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate, a position held from 1899 to 1901. He also served as a member of the Executive Council from 1905 to 1907. Floyd next secured the 1906 Republican gubernatorial nomination. After a close popular election, the legislature named Floyd the official governor. During his tenure, a state tax commission was initiated; prison reform measures were enacted; state roads continued to progress; and free legislative railroad passes were eliminated. After completing his term, Floyd presided over the 1912 Republican National Convention. He also served during World War I as the state fuel administrator; and chaired the state tax commission from 1921 to 1923. Governor Charles M. Floyd passed away on February 3, 1923 in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Charles M Floyd NH State House Portrait

June 8

1772 - The New Hampshire Town of Francestown was Incorporated

Francestown NH Incorporated June 8 1772

1775 - Major John Sullivan writes to Governor Wentworth expressing his concern over the growing number of British troops arriving in New Hampshire.

Major John Sullivan's letter to Governor Wentworth June 8, 1775

1783 - Born: Samuel Cushman in Portsmouth NH. Samuel attended the common schools; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Portsmouth; served as judge of the Portsmouth police court; county treasurer 1823-1828; member of the State house of representatives 1833-1835; nominated by President Jackson to be United States attorney for the district of New Hampshire but was not confirmed; elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-fourth Congress and reelected as a Democrat to the Twenty-fifth Congress (March 4, 1835-March 3, 1839); chairman, Committee on Commerce (Twenty-fifth Congress); United States Navy officer at Portsmouth 1845-1849; died in Portsmouth, N.H., on May 20, 1851; interment in Proprietors' Burying Ground.

1839 - Born: Cyrus Adams Sulloway, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Grafton, Grafton County, N.H., June 8, 1839; attended the common schools, Colby Academy, and Kimball Academy; studied law in Franklin, N.H.; was admitted to the bar in 1863 and commenced practice in Manchester, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives in 1872, 1873, and 1887-1893; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fourth and to the eight succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1895-March 3, 1913); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of Justice (Fifty-fifth Congress), Committee on Invalid Pensions (Fifty-sixth through Sixty-second Congresses); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1912 to the Sixty-third Congress; elected to the Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Congresses and served from March 4, 1915, until his death in Washington, D.C., March 11, 1917; interment in the City Cemetery, Franklin, N.H.

Cyrus Adams Sulloway, New Hampshire Congressman

June 9


1785: Born - Sylvanus Thayer - Superintendent of West Point and an officer during the War of 1812. Donated money to create the Thayer Scool of Engineering at Dartmouth College.

Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General Sylvanus Thayer (June 9, 1785 – September 7, 1872) also known as "the Father of West Point" was an early superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point and an early advocate of engineering education in the United States. Early Life and Education Sylvanus Thayer (9 June 1785-7 Sept. 1872) was born in Braintree, Massachusetts, the son of farmer Nathaniel Thayer and his wife Dorcas Faxon.

In 1793, at the age of 8, Thayer was sent to live with his uncle Azariah Faxon and attend school in Washington, New Hampshire. There he met General Benjamin Pierce, who, like Faxon, was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. In 1803 Thayer matriculated at Dartmouth College, graduating in 1807 as valedictorian of his class. Thayer, however, never gave the valedictory address at Dartmouth, having been granted an appointment to West Point by President Thomas Jefferson at the behest of General Pierce. Thayer graduated from the United States Military Academy after a single year, and received his commission as a second lieutenant in 1808. His first assignment was supervising the construction of Fort Warren (later renamed Fort Winthrop) in Boston Harbor, foreshadowing the bulk of his later career.[3] During the War of 1812, Thayer directed the fortification and defense of Norfolk, Virginia, and was promoted to major. In 1815, Thayer was provided $5,000 to travel to Europe, where he studied for two years at the French École Polytechnique. While traveling in Europe he amassed a collection of science and especially mathematics texts that now form a valuable collection for historians of mathematics.

Superintendent of West Point In 1817, President James Monroe ordered Thayer to West Point to become superintendent of the Military Academy following the resignation of Captain Alden Partridge. Under his stewardship, the Academy became the nation's first college of engineering. While at West Point Thayer established numerous traditions and policies which are still in use at West Point. These include the values of honor and responsibility, strict mental and physical discipline, the demerit system, summer encampment, high academic standards and the requirement that cadets maintain outstanding military bearing and appearance at all times. Many of the cadets who attended West Point during Thayer's tenure, held key leadership positions during the Mexican War and American Civil War. Later career Colonel Thayer's time at West Point ended with his resignation in 1833, after a disagreement with President Andrew Jackson. He was elected an Associate Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1834.

 Thayer returned to duty with the Army Corps of Engineers. Thayer spent the great majority of the next 30 years as the chief engineer for the Boston area. During this time he oversaw the construction of both Fort Warren and Fort Independence to defend Boston Harbor. Thayer's great engineering ability can be observed in both of the above-mentioned forts. Thayer retired from the Army on June 1, 1863 with the rank of colonel in the Corps of Engineers. Death and legacy As a result of Thayer's enduring legacy at the United States Military Academy, in 1869 a meeting took place in Braintree between Thayer and the West Point graduate and Civil War hero Brigadier General Robert Anderson. An outcome of Anderson's 1869 meeting with Thayer was the establishment of the Military Academy's Association of Graduates (AoG). In 1867, Thayer donated $40,000 to the trustees of Dartmouth College to create the Thayer School of Engineering. Thayer personally located and recommended USMA graduate Lieutenant Robert Fletcher to Dartmouth president Asa Dodge Smith. Fletcher became the school's first—then only—professor and dean. The Thayer School admitted its first three students to a graduate program in 1871. Also in 1871 at the bequest of his will Thayer Academy in Braintree, Massachusetts was conceived. It opened September 12, 1877. Thayer died on September 7, 1872 at his home in Braintree. He was reinterred at West Point Cemetery in 1877. Thayer's obituary appeared in the New York Times on September 8, 1872.


1836 - Born: Celia Laighton Thaxter was Born in Portsmouth NH June 9, 1836.


June 10

1772 - Born: David L. Morril - Born in Epping New Hampshire. Represented New Hampshire in the US Senate from 1817 - 1823. Governor of New Hampshire from 1824 - 1827.

David Morril wastaught by his grandfather and later attended Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H.; studied medicine and engaged in practice in Epsom, N.H., 1793-1800; studied theology; was ordained; pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Goffstown 1802-1811; resumed the practice of medicine; member, State house of representatives 1808-1817, and served as speaker in 1816; elected as a Democratic Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1817, to March 3, 1823; was not a candidate for renomination; member and president, State senate 1823-1824; Governor of New Hampshire 1824-1827; moved to Concord in 1831; edited the New Hampshire Observer 1831-1833; died in Concord, N.H., January 28, 1849; interment in Old North Cemetery.

1811 - Born : Joseph Albree Gilmore - The thirty-seventh governor of New Hampshire, was born in Weston, Vermont on June 10, 1811. His education was attained in the commons schools of his native state. After working in the mercantile industry in Boston, Gilmore moved to Concord, New Hampshire, where he established a successful wholesale grocery business. He also became involved with the Concord and Claremont Railroad, serving first as a construction agent, and later as the railroad superintendent. Gilmore first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate, a position he held from 1858 to 1860, and from which he also served as senate president in 1859. He next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1863. He was reelected to a second term in 1864. During his tenure, most of his efforts were consumed by the war; and a loan was secured that provided payments to soldiers, as well as for the transporting of soldiers on furloughs. After completing his term, Gilmore retired from political life. Governor Joseph A. Gilmore passed away on April 7, 1867, and was buried in the Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

1846 - Born: Henry Brewer Quinby. Born in Biddeford Maine, Governor of New Hampshire from 1909 - 1911.

The sixty-first governor of New Hampshire, was born in Biddeford, Maine on June 10, 1846. His education was attained at Bowdoin College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1869, as well as a master's degree in 1872. He later attended the National Medical College in Washington, D.C., where he received his medical degree in 1880. Quinby first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1887 to 1889. He also served as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1889 to 1891; was a member of the Executive Council from 1891 to 1893; served as a delegate to the 1893 Republican National Convention, and was chairman to the 1896 State Republican Convention. Quinby next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1908. During his tenure, the state National Guard was restructured; facilities at the state hospital and state prison were improved; the Keene State College was established; and the state house was refurbished. After leaving the governorship, Quinby retired from politics. He continued to stay active, serving on the board of several civic organizations. Governor Henry B. Quinby passed away on February 8, 1924 in New York City.

June 11

1802- The Town of Milton Mills was Incorporated

June 13

1767 - Newly appointed Royal Governor John Wentworth is received in Portsmouth, New Hampshire

1920 - Born: James Colgate Cleveland, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Montclair, Essex County, N.J., June 13, 1920

Jamesattended public schools and Deerfield Academy; graduated from Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y., in 1941, and from Yale Law School in 1948; enlisted in United States Army in December 1941 and served forty months overseas in the Pacific in the Fortieth Infantry Division and was discharged as a captain of Field Artillery, February 1946; was recalled to oversea duty in the Korean conflict from June 1951 to November 1952; awarded the Bronze Star for valor; after graduation from Yale in 1948 served briefly in the office of Senator Styles Bridges; was admitted to the bar in 1948 and began the practice of law in Concord and New London, N.H., in January 1949; organizer, incorporator, officer, and director of New London Trust Co.; member of the State senate, 1950-1962, and twice served as majority floor leader; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-eighth and to the eight succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1963-January 3, 1981); was not a candidate for reelection in 1980 to the Ninety-seventh Congress; died December 3, 1995.

June 14

1730: William Whipple, Signer of the Declaration of Independence was born in Kittery Maine. 

William Whipple was born at Kittery Maine, in 1730. He was educated at a common school until his early teens, when he went off to sea to find his fortune. He was an able seaman, earning the position of Ship's Master by the age of 21. He worked hard and amassed a great deal of money. In 1759 he landed in Portsmouth and, in partnership with his brother, established himself as a merchant. Calls to public duty began almost immediately. He was elected to several local offices and was involved in the Patriot movement.

In 1775 he was elected to represent his town at the provincial congress. The following year New Hampshire dissolved the Royal government and reorganized with a House of Representatives and an Executive Council. Whipple was made a Council member, a member of the Committee of Safety, and was promptly elected to the Continental Congress. He served there through 1779, though he took much leave for military affairs. In 1777 he was made Brigadier General of the New Hampshire Militia. General Whipple led men in the successful expedition against General Burgoyne at the battles of Stillwater and Saratoga.

After the war Whipple was appointed an associate justice of the Superior Court of New Hampshire. He suffered from a heart ailment for several years and he died, fainting from atop his horse while traveling his court circuit, in November of 1785

June 15

1776 - New Hampshire Declares its Independence from Great Britian

New Hampshire Declaration of Independence

1792 - The New Hampshire Town of  Hebron (Grafton County)was Incorporated

June 16

1713: Born - Meshech Weare - The first governor (then called president) of New Hampshire, was born in Hampton Falls, New Hampshire on June 16, 1713. His education was attained at Harvard University, where he graduated in 1735. He studied law, and then established his legal career. Weare first entered politics as town moderator, a position he was elected to in 1739. He served as a member of the State House of Representatives, as well as serving three times as speaker and eight years as clerk. He also served as a delegate to the 1754 Albany Congress. After independence from England was declared, Weare served as the first president of New Hampshire. He was reelected to a one-year term in 1784. Weare also held dual roles as chief justice of the Superior Court, serving from 1776 to 1782; and was the presiding officer of the Governor's Council from 1776 to 1784. Because of his outstanding leadership, he was often referred to as "the father of his state." After completing his final term on June 1, 1785, Weare retired from public service. Governor Meshech Weare passed away in Hampton Falls on January 14. 1786.

1782 - Born: Nehemiah Eastman, (uncle of Ira Allen Eastman), a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Gilmanton, Belknap County, N.H., June 16, 1782; attended the local academy in Gilmanton; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1807 and practiced in Farmington, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives in 1813; served in the State senate 1820-1825; elected as an Adams candidate to the Nineteenth Congress (March 4, 1825-March 3, 1827); resumed the practice of law; died in Farmington, N.H., January 11, 1856; interment in Farmington Cemetery.

1790 - The New Hampshire town of Bartlett (Carroll County) was Incorporated

Bartlett NH - Carroll County Incorporated June 16, 1790

1806 - Residents of Portsmouth observed a Total Eclipse of the Sun.

Portsmouth Annals - Solar Eclipse June 16, 1806

1812 - The New Hampshire Town of Gilford (Belknap County) was Incorporated 

Gilford New Hampshire, Belknap County, Incorporated June 16, 1812

1831 - The New Hampshire Town of Freedom (Carroll County) was Incorporated

Freedom New Hampshire, Carroll County, Incorporated June 16, 1831

June 18

1807 - The Town of Wilmot was Incorporated

1780 - The New Hampshire Town of Northfield in Merrimack County was Incorporated

Northfield Merrimack County Incorporated June 19, 1780

June 20

1945: Born - Jedediah C Barker (Franklin New Hampshire), Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor


Jedh Barker was born on June 20, 1945, in Franklin, New Hampshire. At the age of six, he moved with his parents to Park Ridge, New Jersey, where he graduated from grammar school in 1960, and from Park Ridge High School in 1964, where he was captain of the football and baseball teams.

He attended Fairleigh Dickinson University, East Rutherford, New Jersey, and then Northeast Missouri State Teachers College in Kirksville, Missouri until May 1966. While at Northeast, he was a member of the Bulldogs football team. On June 20, 1966, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. He was a member of the Special Volunteer Reserve, 1st Marine Corps District, New York, New York, until discharged to enlist in the regular Marine Corps on October 5, 1966. After completion of recruit training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, in December 1966, he underwent individual combat training and weapons special training with the 2nd Infantry Training Battalion, 1st Infantry Training Regiment, Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. He was promoted to private first class, December 1, 1966, while undergoing individual combat training. In March 1967, PFC Barker joined Marine Air Base Squadron 21, Marine Aircraft Group 12, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, San Francisco, California, and served as group guard until the following June when he was reassigned to Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 3rd Marine Division, in the Republic of Vietnam.

He was promoted to Lance Corporal on September 1, 1967. On the morning of September 21, 1967, during Operation Kingfisher southeast of Con Thien near Phu Oc, the Battalion was ambushed by the 90th regiment of the 324B Division. Lance Corporal Barker was killed in action during this engagement. The Medal of Honor was presented to Barker's family by Vice President Spiro Agnew in ceremonies held on October 31, 1969.[3] Lance Corporal Barker was buried at the George Washington Memorial Park in Paramus, New Jersey


For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a machine gunner with Company F. During a reconnaissance operation L/Cpl. Barker's squad was suddenly hit by enemy sniper fire. The squad immediately deployed to a combat formation and advanced to a strongly fortified enemy position, when it was again struck by small arms and automatic weapons fire, sustaining numerous casualties. Although wounded by the initial burst of fire, L/Cpl. Barker boldly remained in the open, delivering a devastating volume of accurate fire on the numerically superior force. The enemy was intent upon annihilating the small marine force and, realizing that L/Cpl. Barker was a threat to their position, directed the preponderance of their fire on his position. He was again wounded, this time in the right hand, which prevented him from operating his vitally needed machine gun. Suddenly and without warning, an enemy grenade landed in the midst of the few surviving marines. Unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his personal safety, L/Cpl. Barker threw himself upon the deadly grenade, absorbing with his body the full and tremendous force of the explosion. In a final act of bravery, he crawled to the side of a wounded comrade and administered first aid before succumbing to his grievous wounds. His bold initiative, intrepid fighting spirit and unwavering undoubtedly saved his comrades from further injury or possible death and reflected great credit upon himself, the Marine Corps, and the U.S. Naval service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. 

 

June 21

1781: Born - Matthew Harvey :  (brother of Jonathan Harvey), a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Sutton, Merrimack County, N.H., June 21, 1781; studied under private tutors; graduated from Dartmouth College in 1806; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Hopkinton, N.H., in 1809; served in the State house of representatives 1814-1820 and as speaker three terms; elected as a Republican to the Seventeenth Congress and reelected as an Adams-Clay Republican to the Eighteenth Congress (March 4, 1821-March 3, 1825); member of the State senate 1825-1827 and served as its president; member of the executive council 1828 and 1829; Governor of New Hampshire in 1830; appointed by President Jackson judge of the United States District Court for New Hampshire in 1831 and served until his death in Concord, N.H., April 7, 1866; interment in Old North Cemetery. 

1787: Born - Joseph Morrill Harper: a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Limerick, York County, Maine, June 21, 1787; attended the district school and the Fryeburg Academy; studied medicine; commenced practice in Sanbornton, N.H., in 1810; moved to Canterbury, N.H., in 1811 and continued the practice of medicine; served as assistant surgeon in the Fourth Infantry in the War of 1812; member of the State house of representatives in 1826 and 1827; justice of the peace in Canterbury 1826-1865; served in the State senate in 1829 and 1830, the last year as president of the senate and as ex officio Governor from February until June 1831; elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-second and Twenty-third Congresses (March 4, 1831-March 3, 1835); resumed the practice of medicine; justice of the peace and quorum in the State 1835-1865; president of Mechanics’ Bank of Concord 1847-1856; died in Canterbury, N.H., January 15, 1865; interment in the Village Cemetery. 

1788 - New Hampshire ratifies the US Constitution after being the 9th State to approve it.

June 24

1842 - Born: John J. Nolan - Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He served as a Second Lieutenant in the Union Army. He was awarded the Medal of Honor as a Sergeant in Company K, 8th New Hampshire Infantry for action on October 27, 1862 at Georgia Landing, Louisiana. His citation reads "Although prostrated by a cannon shot, refused to give up the flag which he was carrying as color bearer of his regiment and continued to carry it at the head of the regiment throughout the engagement." 

July 1

1766 - Born: Samuel Dinsmoor (Windham), The twenty-second governor of New Hampshire (1831 - 1834).

Samuel was the father of New Hampshire Governor Samuel Jr., was born in Windham, New Hampshire on July 1, 1766. His education was attained at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1789. After working as a teacher, Dinsmoor studied law, and then established his legal career in Keene, New Hampshire. He first entered politics as postmaster of Keene, a position he was appointed to in 1808. He served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1811 to 1813; was an 1820 presidential elector; and served as the state councilor in 1821. He also was probate judge of Cheshire County from 1823 to 1831, and was a commission member that negotiated the boundary issue between Massachusetts and New Hampshire in 1825. Dinsmoor next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1831. He was reelected to a second term in 1832, and to a third term in 1833. During his tenure, several new manufacturing businesses were incorporated; railroads were advanced; banks flourished; and the first free public library in the U.S. was established in Peterborough. After leaving the governorship, Dinsmoor retired from political life. He then entered the private sector, serving as the president of the Ashuelot Bank in Keene. Governor Samuel Dinsmoor passed away on March 15, 1835, and was buried in the Washington Street Cemetery in Keene, New Hampshire.

Samuel Dinsmoor, NH State House Portrait

July 2

1939: Born - John H. Sununu - Governor of New Hampshire form 1983 - 1989

John Sununuwas born in Havana, Cuba. He graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his bachelor's degree in 1961, a master's degree in 1962, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1966. He was a mechanical engineering professor at Tufts University from 1966 to 1968 and associate dean of the College of Engineering until 1973. From 1963 until his election as governor, he served as president of JHS Engineering Company and Thermal Research Inc. He represented Salem in the New Hampshire State Legislature from 1973-1974. He became New Hampshire's 75th Chief Executive on January 6, 1983, and served three consecutive terms. Sununu served on the Advisory Board of the Technology and Policy Program at MIT from 1984-1989. On January 21, 1989, Governor Sununu was commissioned Chief of Staff to President George H. W. Bush, serving in the White House until March 1, 1992. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineers' Committee on Public Engineering Policy and has served as a member of the President's Council on Environmental Quality Advisory Committee. Sununu chaired the National Governors Association, the Coalition of Northeastern Governors, and the Republican Governors Association. From 1992 until 1998, he co-hosted CNN's nightly Crossfire program, a news/public affairs discussion program. He is president of JHS Associates, Ltd. and a partner in Trinity International Partners, a private financial firm. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. 

July 13

1854 - The New Hampshire Town of Monroe was Incorporated

July 14

1763 - The New Hampshire Town of Warren was Incorporated

July 18

1820: Born - Jacob Hart Ela, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Rochester, N.H., July 18, 1820; attended the village school in Rochester; at fourteen years of age was apprenticed in a woolen manufactory and subsequently learned the printer’s trade; member of the State house of representatives in 1857 and 1858; United States marshal from July 1861 to October 1866; elected as a Republican to the Fortieth and Forty-first Congresses (March 4, 1867-March 3, 1871); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Interior (Forty-first Congress); appointed by President Grant as Fifth Auditor of the Treasury on January 1, 1872, and served until June 2, 1881; on June 3, 1881, was appointed Auditor of the Treasury for the Post Office Department and served in that position until his death in Washington, D.C., on August 21, 1884; interment in North Side Cemetery, Rochester, N.H. 

Jacob Hart Ela, Rochester NH July 18, 1820

July 20

1765: Born - John Bell, the eighteenth governor of New Hampshire and father of New Hampshire Governor Charles H. Bell, was born in Londonberry, New Hampshire on July 20, 1765. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of his native state. Bell first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1799 to 1800. He also was a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1803 to 1804; served as councilor from 1817 to 1823; and was the Rockingham County sheriff from 1823 to 1828. Bell next secured the National Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1828. During his tenure, the Exeter Savings Bank was chartered; new farming methods were endorsed; several new schools were founded; and manufacturing within the state was increased. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Bell retired from public service. He continued to stay active in his farming interests. Governor John Bell passed away on March 22, 1836, and was buried in the Village Cemetery in Chester, New Hampshire.

August 6

 

1763 - The New Hampshire Town of Alstead was Granted

Alstead NH Granted 8/06/1763

August 9

1737 - Born: John Wentworth , Colonial Governor of New Hampshire from 1767 - 1775. Born into a New Hampshire family of wealth and position, he attended Harvard College and by 1758 had received both a bachelor and masters degree. He became Governor of New Hampshire in 1766. As a loyalist during the American Revolution, Wentworth was forced to flee to New York City in 1776, and to England in 1778. His property and possessions were seized by the government that was established upon his departure. From the mid-1780s Wentworth lived in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and served as Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia from 1792 until his retirement in 1808. During his service he was knighted and awarded a baronetcy in 1795. Wentworth was buried in the crypt beneath St. Paul's Church in Halifax, where a tablet exists to his memory.

1819- Born: Aaron Fletcher Stevens, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Londonderry, Rockingham County, N.H., August 9, 1819; attended Pinkerton Academy, Derry, N.H., and Crosby’s Nashua Literary Institute, Nashua, N.H.; at the age of sixteen was apprenticed to the trade of machinist and worked as a journeyman for several years; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Nashua, Hillsborough County, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives in 1845; held several local offices; during the Civil War served in the Union Army as major of the First Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, as colonel of the Thirteenth New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, and was brevetted brigadier general; delegate to the Whig National Convention in 1852; president of the common council of Nashua in 1853 and 1854; solicitor of Hillsborough County 1856-1861; city solicitor of Nashua in 1859, 1860, 1865, 1872, and 1875-1877; elected as a Republican to the Fortieth and Forty-first Congresses (March 4, 1867-March 3, 1871); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1870 to the Forty-second Congress; again a member of the State house of representatives 1876-1884; resumed the practice of law; died in Nashua, N.H., May 10, 1887; interment in Nashua Cemetery. 

August 11

1768 - The New Hampshire Town of Rindge was Incorporated

August 16

1777 - The Battle of Bennington

Battle of Bennington
Battle of Bennington Definition: The Battle of Bennington was a military conflict between the Kingdom of Great Britain and its thirteen colonies in North America during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The year and date that the Battle of Bennington took place on Saturday, August 16, 1777. Bennington, a town in southern Vermont near the New York border. The battlefield in which the British and American Forces fought during the Battle of Bennington was located in along the Walloomsac River, New York. The Battle of Bennington was part of the Saratoga campaign and ended in victory for the American colonists.

The Battle of Bennington - The Plan of General John Burgoyne
Following the Battle of Princeton on January 03, 1777 the British army under General William Howe and Lord Charles Cornwallis abandoned nearly all their posts in New Jersey and retired to New York. General John Burgoyne was given command of the British forces charged with gaining control of Lake Champlain and the Hudson River valley. General John Burgoyne planned to cross Lake Champlain from Quebec and capture Ticonderoga before advancing on Albany, New York  where he would rendezvous with the British forces under General Howe coming north from New York City and a smaller force advancing from the Mohawk River valley under Lieutenant Colonel Barry St. Leger thus dividing the colonies of New England from the southern colonies. The plan first faltered when St. Leger was forced to withdraw to Canada following the Siege of Fort Stanwix and the Battle of Oriskany. 

Overview and Summary of the Battle of Bennington
The Americans had a depot at Bennington, in Bennington County, Vermont - the battle was actually fought a few miles to the west along the Walloomsac River in New York. The depot contained vital supplies, stores and horses and was a prime target for the British. General John Burgoyne was running desperately short of supplies and provisions and sent over 800 troops through the Connecticut valley, under Friedrich Baum to capture the depot and the much needed supplies. His force consisted of British, German Hessians, American loyalists, and Indians from the Iroquois Confederacy. About 2,000 New Hampshire militia rushed to the defence of Bennington. General John Stark, who had fought gallantly at the Battle of Bunker Hill and the Battle of Trenton, took command. John Stark led the American charge against the British front, repeatedly charging up the hill where the British lay behind breastworks (temporary fortifications made of earth, thrown up to breast height to provide protection). The Battle of Bennington raged for two hours but the British force was overpowered by superior numbers and Friedrich Baum was forced to surrender. German reinforcements under the command of Heinrich von Breymann looked set to reverse the outcome but were prevented by the arrival of Seth Warner’s Green Mountain Boys, the Vermont militia that had been founded by Ethan Allen. The Green Mountain Boys drove the forces of Heinrich von Breymann away from Bennington taking over 700 prisoners and all of their arms.

The Importance and Significance of the Battle of Bennington
Significance of the Battle of Bennington: The significance of the conflict was that it reduced Burgoyne's army in size by almost 1,000 men, led his Indian support to largely abandon him, and deprived him of supplies. All of these factors, together with St. Leger's forced withdrawal to Quebec. The British were forced to proceed to Saratoga without the supplies, where they met a stunning defeat that turned the tide of the American Revolutionary War. 

General John Stark at the Battle of Bennington

General John Stark - Battle of Bennington

August 19

1814 - Born: Jacob Benton, a Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1867 - 1870

Jacob wasborn in Waterford, Caledonia County, Vt., August 19, 1814; attended the common schools, Lyndon (Vt.) Academy, and Randolph (Vt.) Academy, and was graduated from Burr and Burton Seminary at Manchester in 1839; taught school for several years; moved to Lancaster, Coos County, N.H., in 1842; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1843 and commenced practice in Lancaster; member of the State house of representatives 1854-1856; delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1860; brigadier general, commanding State Volunteers; elected as a Republican to the Fortieth and Forty-first Congresses (March 4, 1867-March 3, 1871); declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1870; resumed the practice of law; died in Lancaster, Coos County, N.H., September 29, 1892; interment in the Summer Street Cemetery.

Jacob Benton, NH Congressman

August 20

1772 - Incorporated - The New Hampshire Town of Randolph

1811- Born: Brigadier General Gilman Marston -  Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1859 - 1862 and 1865 - 1866

Gilman Marston wasborn in Oxford, N.H., August 20, 1811; graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1837 and from the law department of Harvard University in 1840; admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., in 1841; member, State house of representatives 1845-1849; delegate to the State constitutional convention of 1850; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1863); served in the Union Army during the Civil War, resigning his commission as brigadier general in 1865; elected to the Thirty-ninth Congress (March 4, 1865-March 3, 1867); declined the Governorship of Idaho Territory in 1870; member, State house of representatives 1872, 1873, 1876-1878; unsuccessful candidate for election in 1876 to the Forty-fifth Congress; delegate to the State constitutional convention of 1876; appointed to the United States Senate on March 4, 1889, to fill the vacancy in the term commencing on that date and served until June 18, 1889, when a successor was elected; died in Exeter, N.H., July 3, 1890; interment in Exeter Cemetery. 

General Gilman Marston, NH Congressman

1832 - Born: Thaddeus Sobieski Constantine Lowe in Jefferson Mills, New Hampshire. US Army First Aeronaut.

Intellectually curious and driven from a young age, Lowe had almost no formal education but demonstrated an appetite for learning which hinted at his future career as an inventor.  At the age of 18 he attended a lecture on the subject of lighter-than-air gases and so impressed the professor, Reginald Dinkelhoff, with his enthusiasm that Dinkelhoff offered to take the young Lowe on the lecture circuit with him as an assistant.  Over the course of the next decade, Lowe devoted himself to balloon aviation, and became a prominent builder of balloons and showman.  In 1855, at one of his demonstrations, he met the Parisian actress Leontine Augustine Gaschon, and they were wed just one week later.  The couple eventually had ten children.  In the latter part of the decade he set about building bigger balloons, with an eye towards a transatlantic crossing, and began to garner a prominent scientific reputation.  In April, 1861, Lowe intended to make a test run from Cincinnati, Ohio to Washington, D.C.  He took off on April 19, just a week after the fall of Fort Sumter, but instead of heading due east towards Washington Lowe’s balloon was blown way off course, eventually landing in Unionville, South Carolina.  There, he was arrested on suspicion of being a Northern spy.  When he finally convinced the Confederate authorities of his innocence he returned to Cincinnati, only to be immediately summoned to Washington.  The government was in fact interested in his experimental balloons as a means of gathering intelligence.

In June of 1861, Lowe demonstrated for President Lincoln how useful his balloons could be when combined with new electric telegraph technology.  On the 11th of that month, from a height of 500 feet above the National Mall in Washington D.C., Lowe transmitted to the President: “This point of observation commands an extent of country nearly 50 miles in diameter.  The city with its girdle of encampments, presents a superb scene. I have pleasure in sending you this first dispatch ever telegraphed from an aerial station, and in acknowledging indebtedness for your encouragement for the opportunity of demonstrating the availability of the science of aeronautics in the military service of the country.” Little more than a month later, Lowe and his balloon were in action during the First Battle of Bull Run, after which Lincoln approved the formation of the Union Army Balloon Corps, with Lowe as Chief Aeronaut (at a colonel’s salary).  Lowe’s principal contribution to the militarization of balloon technology, and its use in the field, was the portable hydrogen gas generator, which allowed the balloons to accompany the army wherever they were needed.  Made of a rugged material that could withstand the wear and tear of active campaigning, Lowe’s balloons could also be inflated in a very short amount of time.  They were a sensation in Washington, and many prominent military and political figures accompanied him on his ascensions.  He eventually built a total of seven balloons and twelve generators for the war effort. 

In the spring of 1862, Lowe and his balloons played a significant role in the Peninsula Campaign, observing the enemy’s defensive dispositions and helping relay information during the slow but steady advance on Richmond.  At the Battle of Seven Pines, Lowe’s aerial reconnaissance helped identify the buildup of Confederate forces near the Fair Oaks train station prior to the start of the battle.  In addition to providing valuable aerial reconnaissance information, Lowe, when supported with direct telegraphic links to commanders, was able to provide near real-time artillery spotting to Army of the Potomac artillery units.   While operating from Dr. Gaines’ farm on the future Gaines’ Mill battlefield, Lowe was positioned close enough to Richmond that he could clearly see the movements of soldiers and individuals within the city.  The sight of Lowe’s balloons, ominously hanging over the Virginia landscape, certainly must have unsettled the Confederates, who knew their movements were being observed by the enemy.  While several attempts were made to destroy the Union balloons via long range artillery fire, none of Lowe’s balloons were ever damaged or destroyed in combat.  Though Lowe and his balloons were able to avoid damaging enemy fire, Lowe himself contracted a serious bout of malaria from the mosquito infested waters near the Chickahominy River.

After the conclusion of the Peninsula Campaign, Lowe’s Balloon Corps was utilized during the 1862 Fredericksburg and 1863 Chancellorsville campaigns.  During this period, some Union commanders and leaders began to question Lowe’s heavy expenditures and poor administrative skills.  Placed under a more controlling military command structure, the frustrated and sick Lowe resigned from his balloon corps and the use of balloons within the Union armies ended shortly afterwards. 

Lowe returned to the private sector following the war, and made a fortune developing ice-making machines before moving to Los Angeles, California in 1887.  He died at his daughter’s home in Pasadena in 1913, aged 80

Thaddeus Lowe, NH Baloonist

August 25

1811 Born :General John Dana Webster - Hampton NH. Civil War Union Brevet Major General. He served through the Mexican War as a Union Captain of engineers, resigned in 1854 and removed to Chicago, where he engaged in business. At the opening of the Civil War, he took charge of the construction of fortifications at Cairo, Illinois and Paducah, Kentucky. In 1862, he became Colonel of the 1st Illinois artillery, was present at the capture of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and at Shiloh as General Grants chief of staff. He was commissioned Brigadier General in November 1862 and was again General Grant's chief of staff in the Vicksburg Campaign. From 1864, until the end of the war, he served as chief of staff for General William T. Sherman and for General George H. Thomas at the battle of Nashville. He was brevetted Major General of US volunteers on March 13, 1865. After the war, he served as a assessor and a tax collector for the US Internal Revenue

1841 - Born: John Jones - Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient.

John Jones was a Landsman in the Union Navy. His citation reads "Served on board the USS Rhode Island which was engaged in saving the lives of the officers and crew of the USS Monitor, 30 December 1862. Participating in the hazardous rescue of the officers and crew of the sinking Monitor, Jones, after rescuing several of the men, became separated in a heavy gale with other members of the cutter that had set out from the Rhode Island, and spent many hours in the small boat at the mercy of the weather and high seas until finally picked up by a schooner 50 miles east of Cape Hatteras."

Burial:
Saint Mary's Cemetery
Portsmouth

August 27

1827 - Born: James A. Weston, the forty-first and forty-third governor to serve New Hampshire

James Westonwas born in Manchester, New Hampshire on August 27, 1827. His education was attained in academies at Manchester and Piscataquog, where he studied engineering. He went to work in the railroad industry, establishing a successful career an engineer. He first entered politics as mayor of Manchester, a position he won election to in 1861, 1867, 1869, 1870 and 1874. Weston next secured the 1871 Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and after a close popular election, the legislature named Weston the official governor. In 1872 and 1873 he lost his reelection bids, but was successful in winning reelection in 1874. During his two terms, an important railroad merger was authorized; and numerous Democratic appointments were made in the judiciary, as well as in state jobs that were previously held by the Republican party. After completing his term, Weston retired from political life. He continued to stay active, working in the banking, insurance and railroad industries. Governor James A. Weston passed away in Manchester on May 8, 1895.

James A. Weston, NH Govornor

August 29

1768 - Born:  Josiah Bartlett, Jr., (son of Josiah Bartlett), a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Kingston, N.H., August 29, 1768; attended the common schools and was graduated from Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H.; studied medicine and commenced practice in Stratham, Rockingham County, N.H.; member of the State senate in 1809 and 1810; elected as a Republican to the Twelfth Congress (March 4, 1811-March 3, 1813); resumed the practice of medicine; treasurer of Rockingham County; again elected to the State senate, in 1824, and served as president; presidential elector in 1824 and supported John Quincy Adams; resumed the practice of medicine; died in Stratham, N.H., April 16, 1838; interment in the Old Congregational Cemetery.

1771 - Born: GeorgeSullivan, (son of John Sullivan and nephew of James Sullivan),

George Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1811 - 1812.  Born in Durham, N.H., August 29, 1771; was graduated from Harvard University in 1790; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., in 1793; member of the State house of representatives in 1805; attorney general of New Hampshire in 1805 and 1806; elected as a Federalist to the Twelfth Congress (March 4, 1811-March 3, 1813); again a member of the State house of representatives in 1813; served in the State senate in 1814 and 1815; again attorney general of the State 1816-1835; died in Exeter, N.H., April 14, 1838; interment in the Old Cemetery (Winter Street). 

August 30

1774: The New Hampshire Town of Wakefield was Incorporated.

1810: Born - Onslow Stearns, the fortieth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Billerica, Massachusetts on August 30, 1810. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of his native state. Stearns established a successful career in the railroad industry. He started working as a contractor, and eventually became an executive for several railroads. Stearns first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate, a position he held from 1862 to 1864. He also served as president of the senate from 1863 to 1864; and was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1864. Stearns next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in the 1869 general election. He was reelected to a second term in 1870. During his tenure, a board of agriculture was founded; taxes and the state deficit were reduced; and industrial developments were promoted. After completing his term, Stearns retired from political life. He stayed active, working again in the railroad industry. Governor Onslow Stearns passed away on August 30, 1810, and was buried in the Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire.

Onslow Stearns, NH State House Portrait

1869: - Born: Henry French Hollis. Represented New Hampshire in the US Senate from 1913 - 1919.

Henry wasborn in Concord, N.H., August 30, 1869; attended the public schools and studied under private tutors; engaged in civil engineering for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in 1886 and 1887; graduated from Harvard University in 1892; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1893 and commenced practice in Concord; unsuccessful candidate for election in 1900 to the Fifty-seventh Congress; unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Governor in 1902 and 1904; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate for the term beginning March 4, 1913, and served from March 13, 1913, until March 3, 1919; declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1918; chairman, Committee on Enrolled Bills (Sixty-third through Sixty-fifth Congresses); regent of the Smithsonian Institution 1914-1919; United States representative to the Interallied War Finance Council 1918; member of the United States Liquidation Commission for France and England 1919; commenced the practice of international law in 1919; appointed to the International Bank of Bulgaria 1922; died in Paris, France, July 7, 1949; interment in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, N.H. 

Henry French Hollis, NH Senator

August 31

1822:  Born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, August 31, 1822 - General Fitz John Porter - Civil War General

 A cousin of David D. Porter, the New Hampshire native received an appointment to West Point from New York.
        Graduating from West Point in 1845, he was posted to the artillery. Wounded at Chapultepec, he earned two brevets in Mexico and transferred to the adjutant generals department in the 1850s. He was Albert Sidney Johnstons adjutant during the operations against the Mormons. His Civil War-era assignments included: first lieutenant, 4th Artillery (since May 29, 1847); brevet captain and assistant adjutant general (since June 27, 1856); colonel, 15th Infantry (May 14, 1861); chief of staff, Department of Pennsylvania (summer 1861); brigadier general, USV (August 7,1861, to rank from May 17); commanding division, Army of the Potomac (October 3 1861-March 13, 1862); commanding 1st Division, 3rd Corps, Army of the Potomac (March 13-May 18, 1862); commanding 5th Corps (a provisional organization until July 22), Army of the Potomac (May 18-November 10, 1862); and major general, USV (July 4,1862).
        Following initial service as a staff officer under Robert Patterson he began his long-lasting and damaging friendship with McClellan. He led a division to the Peninsula and saw action in the operations against Yorktown. When McClellan created two provisional corps he appointed Porter to the command of one of them. At Beaver Dam Creek and Gaines Mill--at the start of the Seven Days--he displayed excellent generalship in the defensive fighting. Again at Malvern Hill he played a leading role in covering the withdrawal of the army. For this series of battles he was awarded a second star and was brevetted regular army brigadier. His command was sent to reinforce Pope in northern Virginia--an assignment for which he made no secret of his displeasure. At 2nd Bull Run he was ordered to attack the flank and rear of Stonewall Jackson's command. But no attack was launched because the order was based upon faulty information and the indications that Longstreet was then present on the field. An 1878 inquiry under John M. Schofield found that Porter was right in not committing his men to a doomed assault which Longstreet would have crushed. It further found that Porters actions probably saved the Army of Virginia from an even greater disaster. However, these findings came too late to save his military career. After serving in reserve under his friend McClellan at Antietam he was relieved of command on November 10, 1862, and placed under arrest. In the trial for disloyalty, disobedience of orders, and misconduct in the face of the enemy he was damaged by his friendship for the now-deposed McClellan and his own anti-Pope statements. There was a political atmosphere to the court which was composed of Stanton appointees, most of whom received promotions, brevets, or higher commands for their service on the panel. Porter was found guilty on January 10, 1863, and sentenced to be cashiered from the army. Eleven days later the sentence was carried out, and Porter spent much of the remainder of his life trying to get his name cleared. The 1878 Schofield board was a first step and, following its recommendations, President Chester A. Arthur remitted the sentence four years later. By a special act of Congress in 1886 he was recommissioned an infantry colonel, to rank from May 14, 1861, but back pay was denied him. Two days later, with his battle largely won, Porter was retired at his own request. In the postwar years he was involved in mining, construction, and the mercantile businesses. He refused an appointment in the Egyptian army and served as New York City's police, fire, and public works commissioners.
        The controversy over Porter's guilt or innocence has continued among historians, most of whom conclude that the only offense committed by that talented officer was indiscretion. He died in Morristown, New Jersey, May 21, 1901

General Fitz John Porter

September 1

1796 - Born: Nathaniel S. Berry, the thirty-sixth governor of New Hampshire

Nathanielwas born in Bath, Maine on September 1, 1796. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of his native state. As a young boy, he went to work as a tanner’s apprentice. He eventually moved to New Hampshire, where he continued to work in the tanning trade. Berry first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held in 1828, 1833 to 1834, 1837 and 1854. He also served in the New Hampshire State Senate from 1835 to 1836; was a delegate to the 1840 Democratic National Convention; and served on the Grafton County common pleas court bench from 1841 to 1850. From 1856 to 1861 he was a probate judge for Grafton County; and for twenty-three years served as justice of the peace. After running unsuccessfully as a Free-Soil nominee for governor, Berry switched political parties. He then secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1861. He was reelected to a second term in 1862. During his tenure, war issues were dealt with. Also, Berry presided over the 1861 Altoona Conference, in which he presented the address in support of the war. After completing his term, Berry retired from political office. Governor Nathaniel S. Berry passed away in Bristol, New Hampshire on April 27, 1894.

1873 - Born: Robert P. Bass, the sixty-second governor of New Hampshire.

Robert Basswas born in Chicago, Illinois on September 1, 1873. His education was attained at Harvard University, where he graduated in 1896, and where he also took some graduate classes. Before entering into a political career, Bass worked to advance the agriculture and forestry industries. He first entered politics in 1905, serving as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held four years. He also was a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1909 to 1910. Bass next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1910. During his tenure, a child labor law was supported; a state public service commission was created, a bureau of labor was organized; and a workmen's compensation bill was lobbied for. After completing his term, Bass ran unsuccessfully for a U.S. senatorial seat in 1913 and 1926. During World War I, he served as director of Marine Labor, as well as serving as chairman of the National Adjustment Commission. In 1923 he won reelection to the New Hampshire House of Representatives. Governor Robert P. Bass passed away on July 29, 1960 in Peterborough, New Hampshire.

Robert Perkins Bass, NH Governor

September 2

1948 - Born: Sharon Christa McAuliffe, the eldest of Edward and Grace Corrigan's five children, was born on September 2, 1948, in Framingham, Massachusetts. While in high school, Christa met Steve McAuliffe. Christa attended Framingham State College, majored in history, and received her degree in 1970. That year, she and Steve were married. Soon after, they moved to Washington, D.C., where Steve attended law school.

Christa taught school until the birth of her first child, Scott. She then attended Bowie State College and earned a masters degree in school administration in 1978. Shortly thereafter Steve, Christa and Scott moved to Concord, New Hampshire, and Christa's second child, Caroline, was born. The McAuliffes settled into an old, three-story house, Steve began his law practice, and Christa stayed home with the children.

Christa's love of teaching soon led her back to the classroom. First, Christa taught at Bow Memorial School, and then moved to Concord High School. Christa was also actively involved in the community - church, a tennis club, the local playhouse, the YMCA and Concord Hospital. In addition, she was a Girl Scout leader, a jogger and a swimmer.

When the opportunity came to apply to be the first Teacher in Space, everyone who knew Christa told her to "Go for it!" She completed the eleven page application, mailed it at the last minute and hoped for the best. After becoming a finalist, Christa did not think she would be chosen. Some of the other teachers were doctors, authors, scholars. . . she was just an ordinary person. However, she was chosen, out of 11,500 applicants. An ordinary person - to whom ordinary people could relate - doing the extraordinary.

Christa's presence in the space program helped boost public interest and curiosity, and through her participation she became an inspiration to the teaching profession as well. She felt her exposure as the Teacher in Space reflected well on all teachers. Regarding the space program, she said, "A lot of people thought it was over when we reached the Moon. They put space on the back burner. But people have a connection with teachers. Now that a teacher has been selected, they are starting to watch the launches again."

Christa began her training at NASA's facility in Houston in September of 1985. At first she was worried that the other astronauts might think she was just along for the ride. She wanted to prove she could work just as hard as they could. But when they met, the other members of the crew treated her as part of the team. Christa trained with them for 114 hours, and when launch time came, she was ready.

Just 73 seconds after lift-off, the space shuttle Challenger exploded, killing all seven astronauts aboard.

While aboard the shuttle, Christa was to have taught two lessons from space. In one she would have introduced each flight member, explained their roles, shown the cockpit with its 1,300 switches and dials and explained how crew members ate, slept and exercised in microgravity. Her second lesson would have explained how the shuttle flew, discussed why people explore space, and reported on technological advances created by the space program. Throughout her voyage she was to have kept a journal, inspired by the journals of the pioneer women who left their homes in search of a new frontier. Christa said "That's our new frontier out there, and it's everybody's business to know about space."

Grace Corrigan, Christa's mother, said in her book A Journal For Christa, "Christa lived. She never just sat back and existed. Christa always accomplished everything that she was capable of accomplishing. She extended her own limitations. She cared about her fellow human beings. She did the ordinary, but she did it well and unfailingly."

On January 28, 1986, her mission in space ended in tragedy. However, her message continues to speak to us today. Christa's motto was "I touch the future, I teach", and she is teaching us still.

Christa's mission continues here at the Christa McAuliffe Planetarium which was erected in her memory. The idea for a planetarium was suggested by Louise Wiley, a teacher from Northwood, New Hampshire, and was chosen from among many other ideas because it combined Christa's dream of traveling through space with her dedication to teaching. In April, 1988, the New Hampshire Legislature appropriated funds to build the Planetarium, and ground breaking took place on October 26, 1988. Construction was completed in little more than a year. On June 21, 1990 the Planetarium began its mission to educate, incite and entertain learners of all ages in the sciences and humanities by actively engaging them in the exploration of astronomy and space science. Since then nearly 30,000 school children a year, and thousands of others, have passed through the doors to participate in The Ultimate Field Trip. 

SEPTEMBER 4 - LABOR DAY

September 6


1838: Born - Bradbury Longfellow Cilley

         1881 - Yellow Day

September 8

1780: General Enoch Poor was mortally wounded in a duel.

September 9

1762: The New Hampshire Town of New Ipswich was Incorporated

1821: Violent Whirlwind sweeps through New London NH

1842: Born in Portsmouth, Naturalist Elliot Coues

September 10

1850 - Born:  Frank Gay Clarke,  Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1897 - 1901;

Frank Clarke wasborn in Wilton, Hillsborough County, N.H., September 10, 1850; attended Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N.H., and Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H.; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1876 and commenced practice in Peterboro; member of the State house of representatives in 1885; appointed colonel on the military staff of Governor Hale and served in that capacity from 1885 to 1887; served in the State senate in 1889; elected to the State house of representatives in 1891 and chosen speaker of that body; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Congresses and served from March 4, 1897, until his death in Peterboro, Hillsborough County, N.H., January 9, 1901; interment in Pine Hill Cemetery. 

Frank Gay Clarke, NH Congressman 1897 - 1901

September 11

1838 - Coos County Democrat was Established

September 15

1832 - Born: Frank Jones - Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1875 - 1878

Frank wasborn in Barrington, N.H., September 15, 1832; attended the public schools; moved to Portsmouth in 1849 and became a merchant and brewer; owned establishments in Portsmouth and South Boston, Mass.; mayor of Portsmouth in 1868 and 1869; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-fourth and Forty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1875-March 3, 1879); was not a candidate for renomination in 1878; unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Governor of New Hampshire in 1880; affiliated with the Republican Party; interested in railroads; presidential elector on the Republican ticket in 1900; died in Portsmouth, N.H., October 2, 1902; interment in Harmony Grove Cemetery.

Frank Jones, NH Congressman

September 18

1726: Born in Exeter - Nathaniel Folsom - 

Nathaniel Folsom, a Delegate from New Hampshire; born in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., September 18, 1726; attended the public schools; served in the French and Indian Wars as a captain in Colonel Blanchard’s regiment; successively major, lieutenant colonel, and colonel of the Fourth Regiment of New Hampshire Militia, which he commanded at the beginning of the Revolutionary War; brigadier general of the New Hampshire troops sent to Massachusetts and served during the siege of Boston; appointed major general and planned the details of troops sent from New Hampshire to Ticonderoga; Member of the Continental Congress in 1774 and 1777-1780; executive councilor in 1778; a delegate to the State constitutional convention of 1783, serving as its president; chief justice of the court of common pleas; died in Exeter, N.H., on May 26, 1790; interment in Winter Street Cemetery.

September 19

1766: The New Hampshire Town of Acworth was Incorporated

September 20

176-: Born - Clement Storer, Represented NH in Congress from 1807 - 1808 and a Senator from  1817 - 1819.

Clement was born in Kennebunk, Maine, September 20, 1760; completed preparatory studies; studied medicine in Portsmouth, N.H., and in Europe; engaged in the practice of medicine in Portsmouth; captain of militia and held successive ranks to that of major general; member, State house of representatives 1810-1812, serving one year as speaker; elected as a Democratic Republican to the Tenth Congress (March 4, 1807-March 3, 1809); elected as a Democratic Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Jeremiah Mason and served from June 27, 1817, to March 3, 1819; chairman, Committee on the Militia (Fifteenth Congress); high sheriff of Rockingham County 1818-1824; died in Portsmouth, N.H., November 21, 1830; interment in North Cemetery. 

September 23

1723: Woodstock New Hampshire  Granted as Peeling

September 25


September 28

1842: Born - Rear Admiral George Henry Wadleigh in Dover, New Hampshire, and entered the United States Naval Academy on September 26, 1860, with the rank of midshipman. He graduated on May 28, 1863, with the rank of ensign. He then served during the Civil War in the Gulf of Mexico on the steam sloops Lackawanna and Richmond, seeing action at the battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, and receiving promotion to master on November 10, 1865.

After the Civil War he became a companion of the Massachusetts Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States.

In 1866-1869 Wadleigh was in European, Mediterranean and African waters as an officer of Ticonderoga, and received promotion to the rank of lieutenant on November 10, 1866, and to lieutenant commander on March 12, 1868.

During the following decade he had shore duty at the Naval Academy and several other facilities and was Executive Officer of the gunboat Shawmut, monitor Canonicus, schoolship St. Mary's and sloop Pensacola.

Promoted to commander on March 13, 1880, in 1881 he commanded Alliance during an arduous Arctic cruise searching for survivors of the ill-fated Jeannette expedition.

Commander Wadleigh spend most of the 1880s in shore positions. He returned to duty afloat in 1889-1891 as Commanding Officer of the Great Lakes gunboat Michigan. Promoted to captain on July 10, 1894, he commanded the receiving ship Richmond until late in that year, then took command of the new cruiser Minneapolis, in which he cruised in U.S., West Indian and European waters into 1897.

Captain Wadleigh served at the Boston Navy Yard until June 1898, including some very busy months near the end of that tour as the Navy prepared ships for Spanish–American War operations. From July 1898 until December 1901 he was Commanding Officer of the cruiser Philadelphia, in the Pacific, and the receiving ship Wabash at Boston.

He achieved the rank of rear admiral in February 1902 and was briefly Commandant of the Philadelphia Navy Yard and President of the Board of Inspection and Survey before retiring from active duty in June of that year. In retirement, Rear Admiral Wadleigh made his home at Dover, New Hampshire. He died on July 11, 1927.

September 29

1818: Born - Nathaniel B. Baker, the thirty-second governor of New Hampshire, was born in Henniker, New Hampshire on September 29, 1818. His education was attained at Phillips Exeter Academy, and at Harvard University, where he graduated in 1839. He studied law, and then established his legal career in Concord. He also embarked into a successful journalism career, in which he owned and published the New Hampshire Patriot. Baker first entered public service as clerk of the common pleas court, a position he held in 1845. He also served as clerk of the Merrimack County superior court in 1846; was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in 1850; and served as an 1852 presidential elector. Baker next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1854. During his tenure, several new banks were incorporated; resolutions condemning the Missouri Compromise and the Kansas-Nebraska bill both failed to pass; legislation was sanctioned that entitled women the right to make a will; and a number of new organizations, as well as several new businesses were chartered. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Baker moved to Iowa, where he practiced law and became involved in state politics. He served in the Iowa House of Representatives in 1859; and was the state adjutant general from 1861 to 1876. Governor Nathaniel B. Baker passed away in Des Moines, Iowa on September 11, 1876.

October 5

1804: Born - Robert Parker Parrott in Lee NH.Inventor and businessman. The son of US Senator John Fabyan Parrott, Robert Parrott graduated third in his class at West Point in 1824 and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. He served in the Creek Indian War and later in Ordnance Bureau and at West Point, attaining the rank of Captain before resigning in 1836. Building on his father's work as an inventor of naval guns, he began work as superintendent of a foundry in Cold Spring. In partnership with his brother Peter, Parrott soon purchased the foundry from his future brother-in-law Gouverneur Kemble and expanded it into the nation's largest. He continued to experiment with ordnance and in 1861 patented the Parrott Gun, a cannon with a rifled barrel that revolutionized warfare by enhancing the distance and accuracy of artillery and naval gunfire. His guns, available in a variety of sizes and mounts, were in high demand during the Civil War and were a key factor in the Union's victory. Parrott's later inventions included the Parrott Sight and the Parrott Fuse. In 1867, Parrott retired from management of the foundry, but continued experimenting with projectiles and fuses, remaining active in his workshop until his death. The West Point Foundry continued in operation until 1911, and many Parrott Guns are on display at museums, parks and military posts. The remnants of the West Point Foundry are maintained by the Scenic Hudson preservation organization and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

October 7

1847 - First Published : In Portsmouth - The Rockingham Messenger

October 8

1794 - Born: Icabod Goodwin, the thirty-fifth governor of New Hampshire.

Icabod Goodwinwas born in North Berwick, Maine on October 10, 1794. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of his native state. After moving to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Goodwin established a successful career as a businessman. He became the owner of several banks, railroads, boats, and a textile factory. Goodwin first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held in 1838, 1843, 1844, 1850, 1854 and 1856. He also served as a member of the 1850 state constitutional convention. Goodwin next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1859. He was reelected to a second term in 1860. During his tenure, the common pleas court was disbanded; the state supreme court duties were strengthened; regulations in the railroad industry were promoted; the extension of slavery was contested; and troops and provisions were raised for service in the Civil War. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Goodwin retired from political office. Governor Icabod Goodwin passed away on July 4, 1882, and was buried in the South Church Cemetery in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

October 9

1782: Born - Lewis Cass in Exeter, New Hampshire, on October 9, 1782. He received his formal schooling at the Exeter Academy, before moving with his parents to Wilmington, Delaware, in 1799. Cass briefly earned a living as a schoolteacher, before moving to the Northwest Territory in 1801. Purchasing a farm near Zanesville, Ohio, Cass preferred a legal career to life as a farmer.

Cass quickly became an important political figure in the new state of Ohio. He was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives in 1806 and also served as a United States marshal for the Ohio district from 1807 to 1812. He resigned as U.S. marshal in 1812 to enlist in the United States Army. He played an active role in Ohio's defense during the War of 1812. Cass began the war as a colonel under General William Hull. He was present when Hull surrendered Detroit in 1812. Cass quickly moved up the ranks, however, attaining the rank of brigadier general by the war's conclusion.

During the War of 1812, President James Madison appointed Cass the governor of the Michigan Territory. He served in this position from 1813 to 1831. President Andrew Jackson appointed Cass Secretary of War in 1831. Cass held this position until 1836, when Jackson appointed him the United States' ambassador to France. Cass remained in France until 1842. He returned to Michigan and was elected to the United States Senate from that state in 1845. He strongly supported United States expansion and rallied behind President James K. Polk during the U.S.-Mexican War. Cass firmly believed that incorporating new people and territory under United States control would help these people live more fruitful lives. This belief was a major component of Manifest Destiny. Like Cass, many Americans during the 1840s believed that God wanted the Americans to expand -- that it was the United States' God-given destiny.

By 1848, Cass had become one of the most well-known citizens of the United States. That same year, the Democratic Party selected him to be its candidate for President of the United States. The Democrats hoped that Cass would be attractive to a wide variety of Americans because of his views on slavery. Cass advocated popular sovereignty. Under popular sovereignty, the people residing in a territory would decide whether or not their state would allow slavery. While some Americans supported this position, many other people feared that it was too vague. Over the past thirty years, both the North and South had tried to maintain the same number of free and slave states. By maintaining a balance between the two, both sides would have an equal number of senators in the United States government. By creating this balance, neither side would be able to submit a bill to the president to sign into law that would either outlaw slavery or make it legal everywhere. Cass's proposal, theoretically, could upset this balance. Primarily for this reason, Cass lost the presidency to Zachary Taylor, a hero from the Mexican War and a man who refused to state his views on practically any of the issues raised during the campaign, including slavery. Cass did win his former home state of Ohio, but many Ohioans found him unacceptable, including abolitionists.

Following Cass's loss in the election of 1848, he returned to Michigan and continued to serve as one of that state's U.S. Senators. He held his Senate seat until 1857, when he became President James Buchanan's Secretary of State. He resigned this position in 1860 and retired to Detroit, dying there on June 17, 1866.

October 10

1743: Council Meeting in Portsmouth with Indian Agent Coaus (Namesake of Coos County) to Discuss Trading House.

1840 - Born: Evarts W. Farr - Civil War Officer and US Congressman.

Evarts Worcester Farr, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Littleton, Grafton County, N.H., October 10, 1840; attended the common schools and Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H.; during the Civil War entered the Union Army as first lieutenant of Company G, Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry and served as major in the Eleventh Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry; assistant assessor of internal revenue 1865-1869; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1867 and commenced practice in Littleton; assessor of internal revenue 1869-1873; solicitor for Grafton County 1873-1879; member of the executive council of New Hampshire in 1876; elected as a Republican to the Forty-sixth and Forty-seventh Congresses and served from March 4, 1879, until his death in Littleton, N.H., November 30, 1880; interment in Glenwood Cemetery

1918: Born - John W. King, the eighty-first governor of New Hampshire, was born in Manchester, New Hampshire on October 10, 1918. His education was attained at Harvard University, where he earned an A.B. degree in 1938, and an M.A. degree in public law in 1941. He then attended Columbia University, where he earned an LL.B. degree in 1943. After practicing law in New York and New Hampshire, King entered into politics. In 1957, he chaired the Manchester delegation in the New Hampshire House of Representatives, as well as serving as the minority leader of the house in 1959 and 1961. King next secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1962. He won reelection in 1964 and 1966. During his tenure, the Robert Frost historic homestead was established; a state lottery game was initiated that funded the advancement of the state's school system; the home rule for state cities was improved; and the judicial system was updated. After completing his term, King served as a justice on the New Hampshire Supreme Court from 1979 to 1986, serving as chief justice from 1981 to 1986. Governor John W. King passed away on August 9, 1996, and was buried in the New St. Joseph's Cemetery in Bedford, New Hampshire.

October 13

1915: Born - Wesley Powell, the eightieth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on October 13, 1915. His education was attained at the University of New Hampshire, and at Southern Methodist College, where he earned a law degree in 1940. During World War II, he served in the Bomber Command of the Army Air Corps, European Theater of Operations, and was wounded, and later honored for his heroic service. After his military duty, he returned to his position as legislative assistant to U.S. Senator Styles Bridges. He also established a legal practice in Hampton Falls and Manchester. Powell first entered politics in 1950, as an unsuccessful senatorial candidate. He also lost his 1956 gubernatorial bid. However, he was successful in his 1958 campaign, as well as in his 1960 reelection bid. During his tenure, state agencies were consolidated; an increase in taxes was opposed; and tourism was promoted. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Powell retired from political life. He stayed active, practicing law, as well as owning and editing the Hampton Union and Rockingham County Gazette, a weekly newspaper. Governor Wesley Powell passed away on January 6, 1981.

October 18

1803 - Born:  John Sullivan Wells, a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Durham, Strafford County, N.H., October 18, 1803; attended Pembroke (N.H.) Academy; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1828 and practiced in Guildhall, Vt., 1828-1835; moved to Lancaster, N.H., in 1836 and continued the practice of law until 1846; solicitor of Coos County 1838-1847; moved to Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., and resumed the practice of law; member, State house of representatives 1839-1841, serving as speaker in 1841; attorney general of New Hampshire 1847; member and president of the State senate 1851-1852; appointed to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Moses Norris and served from January 16 to March 3, 1855; died in Exeter, N.H., August 1, 1860; interment in Exeter Cemetery, Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H. 

1805 - Born John Randall Reding : Represented New Hampshire in Congress from 1841 - 1844.

a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Portsmouth, N.H., October 18, 1805; attended the common schools; was apprenticed to the printer’s trade and subsequently became an editor; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Congresses (March 4, 1841-March 3, 1845); naval storekeeper at Portsmouth 1853-1858; mayor of Portsmouth in 1860; member of the State house of representatives 1867-1870; died in Portsmouth, N.H., October 8, 1892; interment in Haverhill Cemetery, Haverhill, N.H.

October 20

1814: Born in Portsmouth: John H  Jackson. Lt. Colonel during the Civil War

1817:Born:  Mason Weare Tappan, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Newport, Sullivan County, N.H., October 20, 1817; moved to Bradford, N.H., with his parents; attended private schools and the Hopkinton and Meriden Academies; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1841 and commenced practice in Bradford, N.H.; served in the state house of representatives 1853-1855; elected as an American Party candidate to the Thirty-fourth Congress and reelected as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1855-March 3, 1861); chairman, Committee on Claims (Thirty-sixth Congress); was not a candidate for renomination in 1860; during the Civil War served in the Union Army as colonel of the First Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry; again a member of the state house of representatives in 1860 and 1861; resumed the practice of law; appointed attorney general of the state in 1876, which position he held until his death in Bradford, Merrimack County, N.H., October 25, 1886; interment in Pleasant Hill Cemetery. 

October 23

1815: Walter A. Wood was born in Mason, New Hampshire on October 23, 1815. His father was a wagon and plow manufacturer. At age one the family moved to Rensselaerville, New York. During his early years, he worked in his father’s shop. At age twenty-one (1836), he moved to Hoosick Falls where he worked as a blacksmith for Parsons & Wilder. He was a blacksmith by trade and became an excellent machinist. After four years he moved to Nashville, Tennessee to work as a carriage maker. (1840)

 In 1842, he moved back to Hoosick Falls and married Bessie Parsons, daughter of Seth Parsons. Seth Parsons had been his employer from 1836-1840. He and John White operated a small foundry and machine shop under the name of White and Wood. In 1852, he became interested in a reaper patented by John Manny of Illinois. He purchased shop rights for the New York territory. He divided the purchased territory with Chandler Ball and J. Russell Parsons. Wood represented the western part of the state. The other two represented the eastern part of the state. They both started the manufacturing of the reaper in separate shops. In 1860, the Ball and Parsons Reaper Company burned to the ground. Russell Parsons went to work for Wood.

 Walter A. Wood purchased the Tremont Cotton Factory in 1855 to increase the production of the reaper. In 1852, he built two reapers and by 1858-59 he was producing 5,000 per year. In 1860, the plant was destroyed by fire. He immediately constructed a new plant. In July 1857, the Wood Reaper won first prize by the Syracuse Agricultural Society. In 1861, he patented the “chain rake reaper” that was so unique that it caught the attention of farmers all over the world. A mower was added as well as improvements on all the machines manufactured. By 1865, his reapers and mowers were so successful that financial people became interested in the Wood Company. In 1866, the company was organized as a stock company and called the “Walter A. Wood Mowing and Reaper Machine Company.” Walter A. Wood was President, William Tibbets, Vice President and Willard Gay, Treasurer.

 The second large fire destroyed much of the Wood factory in 1870. They used the Caledonia Mill Building while the factory was being rebuilt. The output of the factory was about 8,000 units during this time. By 1890 the output had increased to approximately 90,000 units. During this time, the reapers and mowers won medals all over the world. (1862: Medal of Merit in England; 1867: Iron and Gold medal in Paris; 1873: medal in Vienna) The factory grew continuously and employment grew as Hoosick Falls prospered with the successful plant.

 His wife Bessie died. They had one child, Lynn P. Wood. In 1868, he married Elizabeth Warren Nicholls and had two children. A boy named Walter, Jr and a girl named Julia. The following is provided by David W Babington Aug, 2007: His second wife's name was Elizabeth Warren Nicholls (spelled commonly now as Nichols), daughter of George Huntington Nicholls (1818, Stratford, CT - 1902, Hoosick Falls, NY) and Julia Louisa Phelps (1818, New York, NY - 1892, Hoosick Falls, NY). Elizabeth Warren Nicholls (Wood) was born 24 Apr 1845 in Hartford, NY. The date of the Walter A Wood marriage to Elizabeth Warren Nicholls was 2 Sep 1868 at the St. Mark's Church in Hoosick Falls. I am not sure when Elizabeth Warren Nicholls (Wood) died, but she could have died in Hoosick Falls.

In 1873, they built a large mansion modeled after an English castle. Beautiful gardens were located toward the rear and extended to a large pond. The entrance to the mansion had a large metal fence that surrounded the front, which is now the Woods Park without the fence. They owned more than 1,000 acres that extended into East Hoosick. They operated a large farm.

Walter A. Wood started the First National Bank of Hoosick Falls. He was elected to the House of Representatives in the 46th and 47th Troy district. (1878-1882) He was President of the Board of Education, as well as President of the Village. He was a vestryman at St. Marks Church and was a generous giver to all denominations.

 Mr. Wood came down with pneumonia and died in 1892 at the age of 77. The factory was shut down and all works lined the streets as his funeral processional passed toward burial. He is buried in the old Maple Grove Cemetery at the back part of the Cemetery

1827 - Born James Franklin Briggs: Represented New Hampshire in Congress 1877-1882.

(father of Frank Obadiah Briggs), a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Bury, Lancashire, England, October 23, 1827; immigrated to the United States in 1829 with his parents, who settled in Holderness (now Ashland), N.H.; attended the common schools and Newbury Academy; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1851 and practiced in Hillsboro, N.H., until 1871; moved to Manchester, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives 1856-1858 and in 1874; during the Civil War served as major of the Eleventh Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry; served in the State senate in 1876; elected as a Republican to the Forty-fifth, Forty-sixth, and Forty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1877-March 3, 1883); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of War (Forty-seventh Congress); was not a candidate for renomination in 1882; resumed the practice of law; again a member of the State house of representatives in 1883, 1891, and 1897, serving as speaker in 1897; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1889; died in Manchester, N.H., January 21, 1905; interment in Green Grove Cemetery, Ashland, Grafton County, N.H

1890 - The General John Stark Monument Dedicated at the New Hampshire State House in Concord NH

October 24

1809: Born - Daniel Clark -  a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Stratham, N.H., October 24, 1809; attended the common schools, Hampton Academy, and Union College, Schenectady, N.Y.; graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1834; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1837 and commenced practice in Epping, N.H.; moved to Manchester in 1839; member, State house of representatives 1842-1843, 1846, 1854-1855; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of James Bell; reelected in 1861, and served from June 27, 1857, to July 27, 1866, when he resigned; served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Thirty-eighth Congress; chairman, Committee on Claims (Thirty-seventh through Thirty-ninth Congresses); United States district judge from 1866 until his death; president of the New Hampshire constitutional convention in 1876; died in Manchester, N.H., on January 2, 1891; interment in Valley Cemetery. 

October 27

1829: Born - Christopher Columbus Andrews - 

As a Union brigadier general, Christopher Columbus Andrews distinguished himself in numerous military campaigns in Arkansas. After the Civil War, he had a successful career as an author and diplomat.

Born in Hillsborough, New Hampshire, on October 27, 1829, to Luther Andrews and Nabby Beard Andrews, Christopher Columbus Andrews attended Francestown Academy and studied law both privately and at Harvard University. Andrews passed the Massachusetts bar examination in 1850 and, soon thereafter, migrated to Kansas Territory, where he advocated for Kansas’s admission as a free state.

Andrews moved to Minnesota in 1856, where he established a law practice and published a series of letters based on his travels throughout the territory. He discussed the area’s Native American culture and championed its potential for economic and political development. In 1859, he won election to the state Senate as a Democrat. During the 1860 election, he supported Stephen A. Douglas and was nominated as a presidential elector for Minnesota. In 1861, Andrews operated the Minnesota Union newspaper, which supported the incoming administration of Abraham Lincoln.

At the start of the Civil War, Andrews initially enlisted as a private in the Third Minnesota Infantry but quickly earned promotion to captain of Company I. Captured along with most of the regiment at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, on July 15, 1862, Andrews was exchanged in October. In the subsequent regimental reorganization, Andrews earned promotion to lieutenant colonel and served throughout the Vicksburg Campaign. For services at Vicksburg, Mississippi, he was promoted to colonel on July 15, 1863, and subsequently commanded a brigade during the Little Rock Campaign. Despite a bout with malaria, he served as post commander after the surrender of Little Rock (Pulaski County). His strong support of the Unionist population helped facilitate the state’s third constitution in the spring of 1864, which laid important groundwork for the state’s eventual readmission to the Union under the fourth constitution ratified in 1868.

On April 1, 1864, as part of Major General Frederick Steele’s Camden Expedition, Andrews defeated Brigadier General Dandridge McRae in the Action at Fitzhugh’s Woods. He was promoted to brigadier general on June 13, 1864, commanding the Second Division of the Seventh Army Corps. In April 1865, he participated in Major General Edward R. S. Canby’s siege of Fort Blakely, Alabama, during the Mobile Campaign. In March 1865, Andrews earned a brevet promotion as major general of volunteers for gallant and meritorious service during the war. Andrews then commanded the district of Mobile, Alabama, and helped implement initial Reconstruction policies in Houston, Texas.

Andrews received an honorable discharge on January 15, 1866, and resumed his law practice in St. Cloud, Minnesota. In 1867, he authored a history of the Mobile Campaign. In 1868, he married Mary Frances Baxter of Central City, Colorado.

After a change in his party affiliation, Andrews served as a Minnesota delegate to the 1868 Republican National Convention. He was appointed as U.S. Minister to Denmark in April 1869 but instead accepted an appointment as U.S. Minister to Sweden and Norway, residing in Stockholm. He served until 1877, lobbying for improved protection for shipboard emigrants and reporting on educational and forestry practices. His only child, Alice Ebba Andrews, was born in Sweden in 1869.

In 1880, Andrews became principal owner and editor of the St. Paul Daily Evening Dispatch but returned to diplomatic service from 1882 to 1885 with an appointment as U.S. Consul General in Rio de Janeiro. From 1895 to 1911, he served as Minnesota chief fire-warden and advocated scientific methods of forestry and forest management. The General C. C. Andrews State Forest in Pine County, Minnesota, was established in 1943 as an outdoor recreation area and preserve for jack pine and red pine.

In 1916, Andrews authored Minnesota’s Civil War monuments commission report on recommendations for state monuments in national military cemeteries in Arkansas, Tennessee, and Georgia. The commission supervised the design and creation of each monument. Andrews and other members of the commission dedicated and unveiled the monument at the Little Rock National Cemetery in a public ceremony on September 22, 1916. Andrews died on September 21, 1923, and is buried at Oakland Cemetery in St. Paul, Minnesota

General Christopher Columbus Andrews

1834 - Born on this day: William Tilton. Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He served in the Union Army as a Sergeant in Company C, 7th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for action during the Richmond Campaign, Virginia. His citation reads "Gallant conduct in the field." 

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Sergeant William Tilton, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 1864, while serving with Company C, 7th New Hampshire Infantry, in action at Richmond Campaign, Virginia, for gallant conduct in the field.

General Orders: Date of Issue: February 20, 1884

Action Date: 1864

William Tilton, Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

October 30

1837: Born in Dover NH, Dr. George Franklin French

1853: Born -  Frank Dunklee Currier, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Canaan, Grafton County, N.H., October 30, 1853; attended the common schools, Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N.H., and Doctor Hixon’s School, Lowell, Mass.; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1874 and commenced practice in Canaan, N.H.; member of the State house of representatives in 1879; secretary of the Republican State committee 1882-1890; clerk of the State senate in 1883 and 1885; delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1884; member of the State senate in 1887 and served as president of that body; naval officer of customs at the port of Boston, Mass., 1890-1894; speaker of the State house of representatives in 1899; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-seventh and to the five succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1901-March 3, 1913); chairman, Committee on Patents (Fifty-eighth through Sixty-first Congresses); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1912 to the Sixty-third Congress; retired from public life; died in Canaan, N.H., November 25, 1921; interment in Canaan Street Cemetery

November 2

1779 -Born: John Adams Harper, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Derryfield, N.H., November 2, 1779

Johnattended Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H., in 1794; studied law; was admitted to the bar about 1802 and commenced practice in Sanbornton, N.H.; first postmaster of Sanbornton, N.H.; moved to Meredith Bridge (now Laconia, Belknap County) in 1806; clerk of the State senate 1805-1808; member of the State house of representatives in 1809 and 1810; served in the State militia 1809-1812; elected as a Republican to the Twelfth Congress (March 4, 1811-March 3, 1813); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1812 to the Thirteenth Congress; died at Meredith Bridge, N.H., June 18, 1816; interment in Union Cemetery

1828: Born: Harris Merrill Plaisted, a Representative from Maine; born in Jefferson, Coos County, N.H., November 2, 1828; attended the common schools, and was graduated from Waterville (Maine) College in 1853 and from the Albany (N.Y.) Law School in 1856; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Bangor, Maine, in 1856; during the Civil War served in the Union Army and was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the Eleventh Regiment, Maine Infantry, October 30, 1861, and colonel May 12, 1862; brevetted brigadier general of Volunteers February 21, 1865, and major general March 13, 1865; member of the State house of representatives in 1867 and 1868; delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1868; attorney general of Maine 1873-1875; elected as a Republican to the Forty-fourth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Samuel F. Hersey and served from September 13, 1875, to March 3, 1877; was not a candidate for renomination in 1876; author of “Digest of Maine Reports from 1820 to 1880”; Governor of Maine 1881-1883; editor and publisher of the New Age, Augusta, from 1883 until his death in Bangor, Maine, January 31, 1898; interment in Mount Hope Cemetery.

November 3

1749: New Hampshire Town of Dublin is Incorporated

November 4

1774 - The New Hampshire Town of Stoddard was Incorporated.

1784 - The New Hampshire town of Dalton was Incorporated

November 5

1779: Incorporated, the New Hampshire Town of Hancock

1782: The HMS America built under the supervision of John Paul Jones was launched in Portsmouthon November 5, 1782.

HMS America Launched in Portsmouth NH - November 5, 1782
HMS America built in Portsmouth NH

1818: Born in Deerfield NH - General Benjamin Franklin Butler, Civil War General.

General Benjamin Franklin Butler

1827 Born:  Joshua Gilman Hall, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Wakefield, Carroll County, N.H., November 5, 1828; attended Gilmanton Academy, and was graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1851; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1855 and practiced in Wakefield and Dover, N.H.; solicitor of the county of Strafford 1862-1874; mayor of Dover in 1866 and 1867; member of the State senate 1871 and 1872; served in the State house of representatives in 1874; attorney of the United States for the district of Hampshire from April 1874 to February 1879; elected as a Republican to the Forty-sixth and Forty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1879-March 3, 1883); resumed the practice of his profession; died in Dover, Strafford County, N.H., on October 31, 1898; interment in Pine Hill Cemetery. 

Joshua Gilman Hall

November 7

1809 - Born -Daniel Marcy, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Portsmouth, N.H., November 7, 1809; attended the common schools; followed the sea and later engaged in shipbuilding; member of the State house of representatives 1854-1857; served in the State senate in 1857 and 1858; unsuccessful candidate for election to the Thirty-sixth Congress in 1858, and to the Thirty-seventh Congress in 1860; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-eighth Congress (March 4, 1863-March 3, 1865); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1864 to the Thirty-ninth Congress; again served in the State senate in 1871 and 1872; died in Portsmouth, N.H., November 3, 1893; interment in Proprietors’ Burying Ground.

November 8

1781 - The New Hampshire Town of Thornton was Incorporated

November 10

1768 - The New Hampshire Town of Henniker was Incorporated

1887: Born - Robert O. Blood, the seventy-fifth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Enfield, New Hampshire on November 10, 1887. His education was attained at Dartmouth College, where he earned both a bachelor degree, as well as a medical degree. During World War I, he served in the U.S. Medical Corps as a lieutenant, and was awarded medals from both France and Britain. After establishing a successful medical practice, Blood entered into politics. He served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1935 to 1936; and was a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1937 to 1940, serving as president of the senate from 1939 to 1940. Blood next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1940. He won reelection to a second term in 1942. During his tenure, World War II measures were initiated, such as the rationing of gasoline and the creation of the state council of defense. Also, a state employees' classification system was set-up; a biennial budget plan was implemented; and the state deficit was eliminated. After completing his term, Blood ran unsuccessfully for a U.S. congressional seat in 1946. He continued to stay politically active, serving as a member of the Republican National Conventions from 1944 to 1960. Governor Robert O. Blood passed away on August 3, 1975, and was buried in the Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire.

November 13

1792: born - 

Anthony Colby, the twenty-eighth governor of New Hampshire, was born in New London, New Hampshire on November 13, 1792. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of his native state. He went on to establish a successful business career, with accomplishments that included the initiation of a stage line, construction of a gristmill, and the launching of the scythe industry. Colby also had a long career in the military. In 1814 he served as an ensign in the state militia, and by 1837 he attained the rank of major general. Colby first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1828 to 1832 and 1837 to 1839. He also ran unsuccessfully for a congressional seat in 1833 and 1835, and was defeated in his 1843, 1844 and 1845 gubernatorial campaigns. In 1846, Colby secured the Whig gubernatorial nomination, and went on to win the general election. During his tenure, issues dealing with the Mexican War were addressed. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Colby left office, but continued to stay active in politics. He served again in the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1860 to 1861; and was the state adjutant general from 1861 to 1863. He also founded and funded the Colby-Sawyer College, and for twenty years served as a trustee for Dartmouth College. Governor Anthony Colby passed away on July 13, 1873, and was buried in the Old Main Street Cemetery in New London, New Hampshire.

1845: Born - US Navy Rear Admiral Asa Walker in Portsmouth New Hampshire. Walker graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1866. After graduation he was assigned to the U.S.S. Sacramento and later was transferred to the Portsmouth Navy Yard on ordinance duty. He was promoted to Ensign on March 12, 1868, Lieutenant on March 12, 1870, Lt. Commander on December 12, 1884, Commander on December 11, 1894 and Captain on September 8, 1899. During the Spanish America War Walker was one of Admiral Dewey's Commanders and on May 1, 1898 he took command of the United States steamer Concord and participated in the Battle of Manila Bay. He was advanced nine slots for "eminent and conspicuous conduct in the battle". From 1899 through 1900 Walker was on duty at the Naval War College in Newport, and from 1900 to 1901 was a member of the Naval Examining Board. From January, 1902 until November, 1903 he commanded the United States Steamer San Francisco. In 1904 and 1905 he commanded the USS Wabash and on January 7, 1906 was promoted to Rear Admiral. In February, 1906 Walker was appointed Superintendent of the Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C. Walker retired in 1907 at the mandatory age of 62. At the time of his retirement he was the twelfth senior Admiral in the Navy

November 14

1906 Born: Lane Dwinell, the seventy-ninth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Newport, Vermont, on November 14, 1906. His education was attained at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1928, and then at the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration, where he earned an M.C.S. degree in 1929. After working for General Motors, Dwinell became a partner in the Carter and Churchill Company, and eventually became the company sole's owner. He first entered politics in 1948, serving as a member of the New Hampshire Constitutional Convention. He also served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1949 to 1952; was speaker of the house from 1951 to 1952; and was a member and president of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1953 to 1954. Dwinell next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1954. He won reelection to a second term in 1956. During his tenure, state salaries were increased; highways and roads were advanced; the state's accounting system was restructured; and a hundred new schools were developed. After leaving office, Dwinell served as a delegate to the Republican National Conventions in 1956, 1968, and 1972. He later worked for the federal agency for International Development, a position he held from 1969 to 1971. Governor Lane Dwinell passed away on March 27, 1997 in Hanover, New Hampshire.

November 16

1755: Born - James Sheafe, a Representative and a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Portsmouth, N.H., November 16, 1755; completed preparatory studies and graduated from Harvard College in 1774; engaged in mercantile pursuits; member, State house of representatives 1788-1790; member, State senate 1791, 1793, 1799; member, State executive council 1799; elected as a Federalist to the Sixth Congress (March 4, 1799-March 3, 1801); elected to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1801, until his resignation on June 14, 1802; unsuccessful candidate for governor of New Hampshire in 1816; died in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N.H., December 5, 1829; interment in St. John’s Church Cemetery.

1779 - The New Hampshire Town of Northumberland was Incorporated

1779 - The New Hampshire Town of Stratford was Incorporated

November 17

1738 - The Town of East Kingston was Incorporated.

November 18


1823: Born: Charles H Bell in Chester New Hampshire. 

Charles H. Bell, the forty-seventh governor of New Hampshire, was born in Chester, New Hampshire on November 18, 1823. His education was attained at Pembroke Academy, at Phillips Exeter Academy, and at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1844. After studying law, Bell established his legal career, serving as the prosecuting attorney for Rockingham County from 1856 to 1866. He also became involved in the literary world. He was the editor of the Exeter News Letter for a number of years, and was the author of several historical books. Bell entered politics in 1858, serving as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held until 1860, and from which he also served as speaker in 1860. He also served as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1863 to 1864; was senate president in 1864; and served as a member of the U.S. Senate from March 1879 to June 1879. Bell next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in the 1881 general election. During his tenure, a state board of health was created; and a liquor prohibition bill was promoted. After completing his term, Bell retired from political life. He stayed active, returning to his literary pursuits and his legal interests. Governor Charles H. Bell passed away on November 11, 1893, and was buried in the Exeter Cemetery in Exeter, New Hampshire.

1923: 

Alan B. Shepard was born November 18, 1923, in East Derry, New Hampshire and died on July 21, 1998. He attended primary and secondary schools in East Derry and Derry, New Hampshire; received a Bachelor of Science degree from the United States Naval Academy in 1944, an Honorary Master of Arts degree from Dartmouth College in 1962, and Honorary Doctorate of Science from Miami University (Oxford, Ohio) in 1971, and an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities from Franklin Pierce College in 1972. Graduated Naval Test Pilot School in 1951; Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island in 1957.

He was awarded the congressional Medal of Honor (Space), two NASA Distinguished Service Medals, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, the Navy Astronaut Wings, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal, and the Navy Distinguished Flying Cross. He was a recipient of the Langley Medal (highest award of the Smithsonian Institution) on May 5, 1964, the Lambert Trophy, the Kinchloe Trophy, the Cabot Award, the Collier Trophy, the City of New York Gold Medal (1971), and the achievement Award for 1971. Shepard was appointed by the President in July 1971 as a delegate to the 26th United Nations General Assembly and served through the entire assembly which lasted from September to December 1971.

Rear Admiral Shepard was one of the Mercury astronauts named by NASA in April 1959, and he holds the distinction of being the first American to journey into space. On May 5, 1961, in the Freedom 7 spacecraft, he was launched by a Redstone vehicle on a ballistic trajectory suborbital flight--a flight which carried him to an altitude of 116 statute miles and to a landing point 302 statute miles down the Atlantic Missile Range.

November 20

1778 - The New Hampshire Town of Hill was Incorporated.

November 21

1729 - Born: Josiah Bartlett- New Hampshire Governor From 1790 - 1794.Josiah Bartlett was born at Amesbury, Massachusetts. He studied the science of medicine, and practiced as a physician at Kingston, in New Hampshire. He became involved in politics and was elected a member of the Colonial Legislature. He was noted as a principled legislator, not susceptible to pressure from the Royal Governor, and as an active advocate against British oppression. He was a member of a Committee of Safety, and served as commander of a militia regiment in 1775. In that year he was also elected to represent New Hampshire in the Continental Congress. He voted for independence, and was the first to sign the Declaration, after John Hancock. He continued to serve in 1777 and participated in the ratification of the Articles of Confederation. He later filled the offices of Judge of Common Pleas and of the Supreme Court of his state, and joined the federal Constitutional Convention in 1787. He was elected president, and then governor, of New Hampshire. He died May 19, 1795.

1798 - Born: Ralph Metcalf - Governor of New Hampshire from 1855 - 1857. RALPH METCALF, the thirty-third governor of New Hampshire, was born in Charlestown, New Hampshire on November 21, 1798. His education was attained at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1823. He studied law, and then established his legal career in New York and New Hampshire. Metcalf first entered politics in 1831, serving as the New Hampshire secretary of state, a position he held five years. From 1838 to 1840 he clerked for U.S. Secretary of Treasury Woodbury; and from 1845 to 1851 served as the Sullivan County register of probate. He also presided over the 1850 committee that compiled state laws, as well as serving as a member of the New Hampshire legislature in 1852 and 1853. Metcalf next secured the Know-Nothing gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1855. He was reelected to a second term in 1856. During his tenure, stronger immigration laws were lobbied for; and a liquor prohibition bill was sanctioned. After completing his term, Metcalf retired from political life. Governor Ralph Metcalf passed away on August 26, 1858, and was buried in the Hope Hill Cemetery in North Charlestown, New Hampshire.

Ralph Metcalf, NH State House Portrait

November 22

1917 - Born: Hugh Gregg.  The seventy-eighth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Nashua, New Hampshire on November 22, 1917. His education was attained at Phillips Exeter Academy, at Yale University, where he graduated in 1939, and at Harvard University, where he earned his law degree in 1942. Gregg served in both World War II and the Korean War, as a special agent with the U.S. Army Counterintelligence Corps. After establishing his legal career, Gregg entered politics as an alderman-at-large in 1947. He also served as the mayor of Nashua in 1950. Gregg next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1952. During his tenure, the New Hampshire "whooper week" was created to promote the state's industrial and agricultural resources, as well as it' tourism programs. After completing his term, Gregg made three unsuccessful gubernatorial bids. He then entered the private sector, founding the Library and Archives of New Hampshire Political Tradition. He also stayed active in defending the New Hampshire first-in-the-nation presidential primary. Governor Hugh Gregg passed away on September 24, 2003.

Hugh Gregg, New Hampshire Governor

November 23

1804: Born - Franklin Pierce - 14th US President. Born in Hillsborough, N.H., November 23, 1804; attended the academies of Hancock and Francestown, N.H.; prepared for college at Exeter and graduated from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, in 1824; studied law; admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Hillsborough in 1827; member, State general court 1829-1833, and served as speaker 1832-1833; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1833-March 3, 1837); elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1837, to February 28, 1842, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Pensions (Twenty-sixth Congress); resumed the practice of law in Concord; district attorney for New Hampshire; declined the appointment as Attorney General of the United States tendered by President James Polk; served in the Mexican War as a colonel and brigadier general; member of the New Hampshire State constitutional convention in 1850 and served as its president; elected President of the United States on the Democratic ticket and served from March 4, 1853, to March 3, 1857; resumed the practice of law; died in Concord, N.H., October 8, 1869; interment in Minat Inclosure, Old North Cemetery. 

November 26

1742: Incorporated - The New Hampshire Town of North Hampton

November 29

1759: Born - Jeremiah Smith, the ninth governor of New Hampshire, was born in Peterborough, New Hampshire on November 29, 1759. His education was attained at Harvard University and Rutgers College in New Jersey, where he graduated in 1780. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1786, and then established his legal career in his hometown of Peterborough. Smith served in the Revolutionary War, and was wounded in the Bennington Battle. He first entered public service as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1787 to 1791. He served as a member of the 1791 and 1792 constitutional conventions; was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1791 to 1797; and served as the U.S. district attorney for New Hampshire from 1797 to 1800. He also served as probate judge of Rockingham County from 1800 to 1802; was a U.S. circuit court judge from 1801 to 1802; and served as chief justice of the New Hampshire superior court from 1802 to 1809. Smith next won election to the governorship in 1809. During his tenure, judicial reforms were lobbied for; and Dartmouth's medical school was advanced. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Smith returned to his legal career. From 1813 to 1816 he served as chief justice of the state supreme court. He also was co-counsel with Daniel Webster and Jeremiah Mason in the well-known 1819 Dartmouth College case. Governor Jeremiah Smith passed away on September 21, 1842, and was buried in the Winter Street Cemetery in Exeter, New Hampshire.

Jeremiah Smith

December 3

1762: Born - Clifton Clagett, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Portsmouth, N.H., December 3, 1762; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Litchfield in 1787; elected as a Federalist to the Eighth Congress (March 4, 1803-March 3, 1805); appointed a justice of the peace and quorum in 1808; appointed judge of probate for Hillsborough County in 1810 and served until his resignation in 1812, having been appointed to a judicial position; moved to Amherst in 1812; appointed a judge of the supreme court in 1812; member of the State house of representatives in 1816; elected as a Republican to the Fifteenth Congress and reelected to the Sixteenth Congress (March 4, 1817-March 3, 1821); appointed judge of probate August 5, 1823, and held the office until his death in Amherst, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, January 25, 1829

December 5

1826: B0rn - John Benjaim Sanborn - American military officer: b. Epsom, N. H., 5 Dec. 1826; d. 1904. He was educated at Dartmouth College, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854, and in that year removed to Saint Paul, Minn., where he engaged in law practice. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 he was adjutant-general and quartermaster-general of Minnesota and assisted in the organization of the troops sent to the front. In 1862 he went to the front with the rank of colonel. He commanded a brigade at Iuka, was engaged at Corinth, Port Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills, and at the siege and assault of Vicksburg. He had been commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers in 1863, and in October 1864 took command of the district of southwest Missouri. He bore the unique record of never having been defeated in action and with the exception of the assault of Vicksburg, never failed of complete success.  In 1867-68 was a member of the Indian Peace Commission. He served in the Minnesota legislature for several terms.

1835: Born - Wheelock V Veazey - Brentwood NH

Veazey received the Medal of Honor for his gallant leadership of the 16th Vermont during the battle. The regiment’s fame continues to this day for repelling Pickett’s Charge.

The Most Important Day

Wheelock Veazeywas born Dec. 5, 1835, in Brentwood, N.H., the 10th child of Jonathan Veazey, Jr., and Anne Stevens Veazey. The family moved to Exeter, N.H., in 1842. He attended Phillips Academy and, later, Dartmouth College. He was a good student but a prankster who was frequently disciplined. He once painted a portrait of Satan above the pulpit at the college chapel. After graduation he attended Albany Law School for a year and was admitted to the Vermont bar.

When war broke out, he left his infant law practice in Springfield, Vt., to enlist. On April 22, 1861, he wrote in his diary,

This is probably the most important day of my life. May God bless our efforts & the Cause.

Before his regiment left for the front, he took time out to marry Julia Beard, daughter of Albin Beard, owner of the Nashua Telegraph. “She seems perfect to me,” he wrote.

Eight days after arriving in Virginia, then-Capt. Veazey fought in a skirmish in Lewinsville, Va. He was quickly noticed as a spirited and capable commander whose regiment had complete confidence in him.

He was named to the court martial board that ordered the execution of the Sleeping Sentinel, who was later pardoned by President Abraham Lincoln.

Four months after enlisting as a private, Veazey was promoted to lieutenant colonel and helped form the 16th Vermont Regiment.

'The Majority Fell Asleep'

He had complained about his troops’ and his own lack of sleep in a letter to his wife. On the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg that, apparently, caught up with them. The rebels opened the fighting that day with a massive bombardment from 140 artillery pieces. Wrote Veazey,

My men were lying flat down, and most of the fire with that of our own artillery which was on the crest in our rear passed over us. I lost several men, however, by it. This continued about 2 hours. The effect of this cannonading on my men was the most remarkable ever witnessed in any battle, many of them, I think, the majority fell asleep. It was with the greatest effort only that I could keep awake myself, not withstanding the cries of my wounded men & my anxiety for the more fearful scene which I knew must speedily follow.

That fearful scene was Pickett’s Charge, an infantry charge ordered by Gen. Robert E. Lee against Union troops holding a position on Cemetery Ridge. Then all of a sudden the artillery fire slackened.

Veazey’s friend Lt. Joseph Goulding described what happened next:

There is a portentious hush and some one with a glass at his eye says: 'there they come,' and just emerging from the rebel lines you can see the long ranks of gray, the shimmer of steel in the July sun as their bayonets glitter above their heads. They are sweeping grandly on and on as they come toward us down the slope. They are in three divisions with a front of about a thousand yards but looking far longer in this smoky air. Now fairly on their way, our fire rekindles and shot and shell tear through their solid masses but the gaps close sternly up and on they come. Their batteries behind them open again over their heads and again the air seems filled with all that kills. They are headed straight for that part of the line where the Vermonters are still hugging the ground and out of sight from the foe who quite naturally suppose them destroyed or paralyzed by the heavy fire to which they have been subjected. Now the gray ranks are almost upon us, their fringe of skirmishers engage ours but are momentarily repulsed while still the heavy charging column comes on nearer and yet nearer. Now within rifle range, their tossing flags wave with their rapid motion as they hurry toward their goal, but just here the long lines of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Sixteenth rise as if suddenly grown out of the very earth at their very feet and pour a deadly volley into those closed massed ranks. They stagger and break and surge off to the right as they meet it and so expose their flank and out upon that flank changing front forward under the storm of lead as if on parade, Veazey swings the Sixteenth on the left of the Thirteenth...and firing as they advance, pours most terrible and destructive volleys into Pickett's dense column which seems to fairly wither and shrivel under them and this unexpected onslaught.

Major Gen. Abner Doubleday waved his hat and shouted, "Glory to God, glory to God, see the Vermonters go at it."

Afterward, a captured Confedereate soldier said he was never more confident of victory as they marched over the field. "But when I saw that Damn Vermont Colonel on foot, hat off, sword swinging in the air in front of his men and cheering them on upon our flank, I knew we were doomed."

Wheelock Veazey won the nation’s highest military honor, the Medal of Honor, for his bravery in battle.

He was mustered out on Aug. 10, 1863, in failing health. Once he recovered, Veazey led an illustrious career as Vermont state senator, judge, and member of the Interstate Commerce Commission.

Wheelock Veazey died March 22, 1898

Wheelock V Veazey

December 6

1834: Born - Henry William Blair, a Representative and a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Campton, Grafton County, N.H., December 6, 1834; attended the common schools and private academies; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1859 and commenced practice in Plymouth, N.H.; appointed prosecuting attorney for Grafton County 1860; during the Civil War served in the Union Army as lieutenant colonel of the Fifteenth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry; member, State house of representatives 1866; member, State senate 1867-1868; elected as a Republican to the Forty-fourth and Forty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1875-March 3, 1879); was not a candidate for renomination in 1878; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate on June 17, 1879, for the vacancy in the term ending March 3, 1885, and served from June 20, 1879, to March 3, 1885; the State legislature not being in session, he was appointed on March 5, 1885, and elected on June 17, 1885, to fill the vacancy in the term beginning March 4, 1885, and served from March 10, 1885, to March 3, 1891; unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1891; chairman, Committee on Education and Labor (Forty-seventh through Fifty-first Congresses); declined an appointment as judge of the district court for the district of New Hampshire tendered by President Benjamin Harrison in 1891; was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to China March 6, 1891; he was objected to by the Chinese Government as being persona non grata; subsequently tendered his resignation which was accepted October 6, 1891; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-third Congress (March 4, 1893-March 3, 1895); was not a candidate for reelection in 1894; engaged in the practice of law in Washington, D.C., until his death on March 14, 1920; interment in Campton Cemetery, Campton, N.H.  

December 7

1858: B.F. Osgood & Sheriff of Coos County make first Winter Ascent of Mount Washington

December 8

1796 - The New Hampshire Town of Jefferson was Incorporated

1842: Born - Richard J. Gage in Orford New Hampshire. Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Private Richard J. Gage, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 2 July 1863, while serving with Company D, 104th Illinois Infantry, in action at Elk River, Tennessee. Private Gage voluntarily joined a small party that, under a heavy fire, captured a stockade and saved the bridge.

General Orders: Date of Issue: October 30, 1897

Action Date: July 2, 1863

December 13

1774 - Paul Revere and his network of patriots caught wind of the new policy. Revere knew the lightly guarded fort in New Castle was vulnerable to attack. He decided to warn the people of New Hampshire that the British were sending an expedition to Fort William and Mary.

Early on the morning of Dec. 13, Revere mounted his horse and began his difficult 60-mile ride to Portsmouth. The roads were rutted with frozen slush and a stiff west wind pierced his clothing. He arrived in Portsmouth that afternoon and went straight to the home of Samuel Cutts, a patriot merchant.

Cutts quickly convened the town’s committee of correspondence and Revere reported the news: British troops were on their way to Fort William and Mary and the king had banned importation of munitions to the colonies. What Revere didn’t know was that British troops would only head toward the fort after it was learned Revere was in Portsmouth.

A Loyalist townsman told Wentworth of Revere’s arrival. Wentworth sent a rider to Boston to ask for help from Governor Thomas Gage. Gage ordered a small vessel to sail to Portsmouth with a detachment of marines and a 20-gun frigate to follow. They wouldn’t arrive until the raid was well over.

1820 - Town of Shelburne is incorporated.

1835 - Born - Ossian Ray, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Hinesburg, Chittenden County, Vt., December 13, 1835; moved to Irasburg, Vt., in early childhood; attended the common schools and an academy in Derby, Vt.; studied law in Irasburg and in Lancaster, N.H., to which latter place he moved in 1854; was admitted to the bar in 1857 and practiced in Essex and Coos Counties; solicitor for Coos County 1862-1872; member of the State house of representatives in 1868 and 1869; delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1872; United States attorney for the district of New Hampshire from February 22, 1879, to December 23, 1880, when he resigned; elected as a Republican to the Forty-sixth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Evarts W. Farr; reelected to the Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth Congresses and served from January 8, 1881, to March 3, 1885; did not seek renomination in 1884; died in Lancaster, N.H., January 28, 1892; interment in the Summer Street Cemetery.

December 14

1774 - 

The Raid of Fort William and Mary (Fort Constitution Begins:

A few minutes before noon on December 14, a drummer, his beats muffled by the falling snow, marched through the streets of the city sounding the call that everyone recognized. Before long, he had collected an entourage of more than two hundred men and boys.

At the fort, guarding the king's powder, were the defenders-Capt. Cochran and five men. At about one o'clock, this tiny garrison received word that an angry mob was on its way from town, growing larger as citizens from Rye and New Castle hastened to join. By the time they reached the gates of the fort, the attackers numbered more than 400.

At about three o'clock in the afternoon a few shots were exchanged, but no one was injured. Before a second volley could be fired, the fort was overwhelmed, and Cochran's band was in the hands of the attackers. Three huzzas were shouted and the king's colors were lowered.

Cochran, though overwhelmed, showed no signs of allowing the keys to the powder magazine to leave his possession. Substituting shoulders for keys, the attackers broke down the door and were able to make off with 97 barrels of powder which they loaded onto moses boats and gundalows for dispersal to the various surrounding towns. The captain of the defenders wrote in his note to Governor Wentworth, "I did all in my power to defend the fort, but all my efforts could not avail against so great a number." With odds of four hundred to six, neither the governor nor posterity could fault him.

Governor Wentworth, caught in an impossible situation, hastily requested ships and troops from Boston. Obviously, he had need of help, for the next morning men from the surrounding countryside began to pour into the city, lured by rumors of the previous day's events. John Sullivan of Durham and his men surrounded the state house and demanded information about possible reinforcements. "None were expected," said Wentworth. The mob dispersed, only to reassemble later that evening to remove remaining military stores from the fort. Again the trophies were loaded at the river.

The powder was soon distributed. Kingston received 12 barrels, Epping 8, Poplin (Fremont) 4, Nottingham 8, Brentwood 6, and Londonderry 1. Remaining stores were distributed in Durham, which received 25 barrels, and in Exeter, where 29 barrels were retained. Four barrels remained in Portsmouth. The precious dust was destined for the powder flasks of the local militia units, the building blocks of the nascent continental army. The powder and the power no longer belonged to King George III, it was in the hands of the people. In New Hampshire, at least, the Revolution had begun.

December 15

1727 - The New Hampshire Town of New Market was Incorporated

1803 - The New Hampshire Town of Mont Vernon was Incorporated

December 16

1795 -Born - Thomas McKey Edwards - a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Keene, Cheshire County, N.H., December 16, 1795; tutored privately; was graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1813; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1817 and commenced practice in Keene, N.H.; postmaster of Keene from June 30, 1818, to July 23, 1829; served in the State house of representatives in 1834, 1836, 1838, and 1839; abandoned his law practice in 1845 and superintended the construction of the Cheshire Railroad, serving as its first president; also served as president of a bank and a fire-insurance company; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1859-March 3, 1863); was not a candidate for renomination in 1862 to the Thirty-eighth Congress; resumed his former business pursuits; died in Keene, N.H., May 1, 1875; interment in Woodlawn Cemetery. 

1898 - Born: Neil Tillotson- Inventor of the Latex Balloon

Neil Tillotson, an industrialist and resort owner who became a celebrity every four years as the first person to vote in the presidential primaries and the election of the president, died Oct. 17 at a hospital in Colebrook, N.H. He was 102.

''I saw Teddy Roosevelt, I was probably 16, 17 years old, at the fairground in Morrisville, Vt., and he made a speech, and he wasn't just something to read about in the paper,'' Mr. Tillotson once told National Public Radio.

That enthralling moment spawned an enduring political spectacle decades later as Mr. Tillotson literally put the polling place of Dixville Notch, N.H., on the map.

While running an international rubber products company out of Boston, Mr. Tillotson bought the Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in Dixville Notch at auction in 1954. He established a home in that White Mountains community, but learned that the nearest polling place, at the county seat, was 50 miles away. Still intrigued by the presidential drama he had witnessed as a boy, he had Dixville Notch incorporated for voting purposes and created an early-bird election special of sorts.

Since the 1960's, the polls at Dixville Notch have opened at midnight for New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary and on election days. Voters -- in some years as many as 30 or so -- cast their ballots at the Balsams. At 12:01 a.m., 100 percent of those eligible having voted, the polls close, and the wire services flash the results around the nation.

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It is participatory democracy in action, but everyone has a good time as well. ''Afterward, we have a little party -- but no booze,'' Mr. Tillotson said.

As the town moderator, Mr. Tillotson was always the first Dixville Notch resident to place his vote in the wooden box at the Balsams's ballot room.

A few other New Hampshire towns have had sporadic midnight voting, but Dixville Notch garners all the attention because the Balsams offers communications facilities for television crews, reporters and photographers.

The hoopla over Dixville Notch, in northern New Hampshire, about 220 miles from Boston, has brought presidential hopefuls trooping to Mr. Tillotson. Gov. George W. Bush visited him during New Hampshire's 2000 Republican presidential primary and Senator John McCain paid two calls.

Governor Bush won 12 votes in Dixville Notch in the Republican primary to Senator McCain's 10. On Election Day, Dixville Notch gave Mr. Bush 21 votes, Vice President Al Gore 5 and Ralph Nader 1.

However charming the tableau at Dixville Notch, it is no rustic New England village. It consists almost entirely of the Balsams, a luxurious getaway on Lake Gloriette, and a factory that is part of a rubber company founded by Mr. Tillotson.

Mr. Tillotson grew up in Beecher Falls, Vt., quit high school, worked for a rubber company in Watertown, Mass., then served as a teenage cavalryman in Gen. John J. Pershing's Mexican expedition, chasing Pancho Villa.

He founded his own rubber company in the early Depression years, at first featuring children's balloons in the shape of a cat, then expanding into an international operation that manufactures industrial products. In the 2000 election campaign, he was still active in overseeing the Tillotson Corporation out of offices in Boston.

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He is survived by his wife, Louise; two sons, Rick, of Colebrook, and Tom, of Dixville Notch; two daughters, Neila Tillotson Monahan of Brewster, Mass., and Janet Tillotson Munchak of Roswell, Ga.; and grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren.

Mr. Tillotson was considered a lifelong Republican, but said he had an open mind in assessing a candidate. ''I think the first thing you look for is honesty,'' he said. ''The next thing is, has he got a brain? And is he emotionally reasonably stable?''

He was hardly overwhelmed by all the excitement over being the first to vote.

''The important thing is, here's a town with, for many elections, 100 percent of the voters voting,'' he said last year. ''That's a lot more important than voting first or last

December 19

1753 - Born: John T. Gilman, the seventh and twelfth governor to serve New Hampshire, was born in Exeter, New Hampshire on December 19, 1753. His education was limited and attained in the common schools of his native state. Gilman first went to work with his father in the shipbuilding business, but eventually left, following his father to the state treasurers office, where he was a clerk during his father's tenure as state treasurer. Gilman favored independence from England and served with a troop of volunteers during the Revolutionary War. He first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1779 to 1781, and 1810 to 1811. He served as a member to the 1780 convention of states, and was a member of the Continental Congress in 1782 and 1783. He also served as the state treasurer of New Hampshire from 1783 to 1788 and 1791 to 1794, and was a member of the 1788 state convention. Gilman next won election to the governorship in 1794, and was sworn into office on June 5, 1794. He went on to win reelection annually until 1804. He lost his reelection bids in 1805, 1806, 1808 and 1812, but was successful in his 1813, 1814, and 1815 campaigns. During his two tenures, Fort William and Mary was restored; the state's economy flourished; the state court system was reorganized; a medical school was initiated to Dartmouth College; and issues dealing with the War of 1812 were addressed. After completing his final term on June 6, 1816, Gilman retired from political life. For several years he served as a trustee for Dartmouth College, as well as for the Phillips Exeter Academy. Governor John T. Gilman passed away on August 31, 1828, and was buried in the Exeter Cemetery in Exeter, New Hampshire.

December 20

1697 - Born: Theodore Atkinson in New Castle New Hampshire.

Theodore Atkinson was born in New Castle, New Hampshire, on December 20, 1697, the son of Mary and Theodore Atkinson (1669–1719), a provincial councilor.1 Atkinson attended Harvard College with the class of 1718. Shortly after graduating, he received a commission as lieutenant of Fort William and Mary in New Castle, a position his father had occupied. In 1720 he was appointed clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, and by 1731 he was admitted as an attorney. In 1722, Atkinson was elected a representative to the General Court. Lieutenant Governor John Wentworth, who had been a close associate of Atkinson’s father, appointed the younger Theodore collector, naval officer, and sheriff of the province. During these years, New Hampshire was a royal province controlled from a distance by the governor of Massachusetts and, locally, by the lieutenant governor. The tension between the local and distant authorities resulted in a political rivalry between Massachusetts Governor Jonathan Belcher and New Hampshire Lieutenant Governor Wentworth. Consequently Belcher removed Atkinson from the first two positions and appointed another man to share the office of sheriff. Atkinson was appointed in 1732 councilor of New Hampshire, but Belcher stalled his appointment for two years.

When John Wentworth died in 1730, his son Benning (1696–1770) rose to power in his place and became the first royally appointed governor of New Hamsphire. Atkinson and the younger Wentworth remained political allies, and the two men dominated New Hampshire politics over the next generation. Atkinson was chosen secretary of the province in 1741, and passed the office to his son, Theodore, Jr., in 1760. Upon his son’s death in 1769, Atkinson resumed the office until 1775. He also served as clerk of the council and was promoted to colonel in the New Hampshire militia. In that capacity, he commanded one of ten New Hampshire regiments in the French and Indian War. In 1754, Atkinson was a delegate to the Albany Congress, which existed to form an alliance between the British colonies and the Iroquois tribes of the Six Nations. The committee ultimately presented a plan of union among the colonies to facilitate their defense, but both the king and the colonial governments rejected it.2 Later that year, Atkinson was appointed chief justice of the Superior Court and remained in that office until the Revolutionary government was formed in 1775. In 1773 he was promoted to major general.

Then Atkinson’s power began to wane, as did that of the royally sanctioned government in general. In December 1774, he confronted a crowd threatening to seize Fort William and Mary, declaring that failure to disband would constitute an Act of High Treason and Rebellion. But instead of being obeyed, Atkinson was mocked.4 When he refused, in July 1775, to turn over the records of the province to the Revolutionary government in Exeter, and the documents were seized from him. Curiously, Atkinson was not named in 1778 among the Loyalists whose land the patriots confiscated, despite the elder statesman’s unambiguous political allegiance to the Crown. Close associates such as Benning and John Wentworth, on the other hand, were individually named in acts passed by the Revolutionary government of New Hampshire as "enemys" of the state, and their property was seized.

Atkinson built a fortune in land investment. In 1719 he inherited a substantial sum, amounting to 1,200 pounds, from his father’s estate. In the mid-1730s, he moved to Portsmouth, where he helped establish an Anglican church—Queen’s Chapel, later renamed St. John’s—and was a warden of the Masons. In 1754 he gave land to the church for building tombs, Vaults & Monuments.6 He expanded his wealth as one of the principal investors in 1739 in the Masonian Proprietorship, which was based on a seventeenth-century land grant of all the property within sixty miles of the New Hampshire coast, including Portsmouth, Dover, and Exeter. That corporation’s success hinged upon the resolution of an ongoing boundary dispute between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, which was settled in 1741 in favor of Atkinson’s province and investment. Inhabitants of the towns established within the proprietorship were granted title to the land they had improved.7 Atkinson and his son also held seventy-three proprietorships in the contested land to the west of New Hampshire, which would later become Vermont.8 The town of Atkinson, New Hampshire, founded in 1767, was named for him.9

Atkinson’s taste for display prompted him not only to have his and his wife’s portraits painted by Joseph Blackburn but also to build a grand house on Court Street in Portsmouth. This residence contained a substantial amount of silver, including a tray engraved with birth and death dates of family members and friends.10 Atkinson apparently owned the finest carriage in town and once challenged another man to a sulky race from Portsmouth to Boston. His interest in sport is suggested by the dedication of the Reverend Joseph Seccombe’s so-called fishing sermon to him.

On September 4, 1732, Atkinson married the widow Hannah Plaisted (1700–1769), daughter of his late political benefactor John Wentworth. This union added 1,000 thousand pounds to Atkinson’s wealth and further solidified his ties to the Wentworth family. Their children Hannah, who was baptized 1734 and died young, and Theodore (1737–1769)—both predeceased their parents.12 When Atkinson, who had no immediate heirs, died in Portsmouth on September 22, 1779, he left the bulk of his fortune to a cousin, George King, on the condition that he change his name to Atkinson. He also left 200 pounds to the Anglican church he helped found in Portsmouth for the distribution of bread to the poor on Sundays. In addition, Atkinson’s will included bequests of 100 pounds apiece to the libraries of Harvard and Dartmouth College; he had been appointed a trustee of the latter school in 1769. He specified that Harvard spend the funds for books "usefull in the Study of the Civil—Statute—& Common Law of England." And the books purchased by both colleges were to be impressed with Atkinson’s initials in gold letters on the binding.

December 21

1799 - New Hampshire Town of Bethlehem Incorporated

December 27

1719: Born - John Phillips: Founder of Phillips Exeter Academy 

December 28

1832: The New Hampshire town of Stark was incorporated.

1835: Born - William Eaton Chandler, a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Concord, N.H., December 28, 1835; attended the common schools and the academies in Thetford, Vt., and Pembroke, N.H.; graduated from Harvard Law School in 1854; admitted to the bar in 1855 and commenced practice in Concord, N.H.; appointed reporter of the decisions of the supreme court of New Hampshire in 1859; member, State house of representatives 1862-1864 and served as speaker during the last two years; appointed by President Abraham Lincoln solicitor and judge advocate general of the Navy Department in 1865; appointed First Assistant Secretary of the Treasury 1865-1867, when he resigned; newspaper publisher and editor in New Hampshire during the 1870s and 1880s; member of the State constitutional convention in 1876; member, State house of representatives 1881; appointed by President Chester Arthur as Secretary of the Navy 1882-1885; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Austin F. Pike and served from June 14, 1887, to March 3, 1889; subsequently elected for the term beginning March 4, 1889; reelected in 1895 and served from June 18, 1889, to March 3, 1901; unsuccessful candidate for renomination; chairman, Committee on Immigration (Fifty-first and Fifty-second Congresses), Committee on Census (Fifty-fourth Congress), Committee on Privileges and Elections (Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Congresses); appointed by President William McKinley as president of the Spanish Claims Treaty Commission 1901-1908; resumed the practice of law in Concord, N.H., and Washington, D.C.; died in Concord, N.H., November 30, 1917; interment in Blossom Hill Cemetery.

William E Chandler - NH State Library Portrait

December 30

1768 - The New Hampshire Town of Meredith was Incorporated

1794 - New Hampshire Town of Middleton was Incorporated

1819 - Born: Ezekial Albert Straw - , the forty-second governor of New Hampshire 1872 - 1874.

Ezekialwas born in Salisbury, New Hampshire on December 30, 1819. After his family moved to Massachusetts, young Ezekiel was educated in the common schools in Lowell. He later attended the Phillips Andover Academy. Straw established a successful career with the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, where he started out as an engineer, and later became the company’s president in 1871. He first entered politics as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, a position he held from 1859 to 1864. He served as a member of the New Hampshire State Senate from 1864 to 1866, and was senate president from 1865 to 1866. He also served as a staff member in the governor's office in 1869; and was a member of the executive board of the planning commission for the 1870 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. Straw next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote in 1872. He won reelection to a second term in 1873. During his tenure, the initiation of a manual and industrial training system for public schools was promoted; the war deficit was reduced; and a local liquor option bill was lobbied for. After completing his term, Straw returned to his various business interests. He returned briefly to politics in 1876, serving as a delegate to the Republican National Convention. Governor Ezekiel A. Straw passed away in Manchester on October 23, 1882.

Ezekial Straw, Nh Governor, NH State House Portrait